Yummy Colors

Grape, chocolate, kiwi, mandarin orange, avacado, blueberry, raspberry, mango, papaya and mint. Lindly Haunani’s 2006 colors make you hungry for more. In her hands polymer clay looks alive and edible.

If you’re feeling shy and tentative about your colors, if your supply of gray waste clay is larger than it should be, sign up for a color class. Check Lindly’s site, track Maggie Maggio down or sign up at your local art school.

Knowing more about color will save you money. You’ll buy three colors instead of the rainbow you now invest in. Your pile of scrap will shrink. You won’t have to pretend that mud was what you were aiming for. Your confidence will grow.

Landscape bracelet


This Tuscan landscape is a recent work from Bettina Welker from Germany. It’s a nice twist on the bangle bracelet originally developed by Margaret Regan. It’s especially noteworthy because it was Bettina’s first landscape cane.

Sometimes when you run into a technique that resonates with your artistic sensibilities, things just "click". It looks like Bettina’s on to something.

Thanks to Jackie Sieben for sending us this example from the Claypen group.

East and West

Maybe others can fill in the blanks here. It’s fun to look at the works of Danqing Coldwell. Apparently there was an article about her in the February 2000 Jewelry Crafts magazine but I missed it.

The artist moved from Beijing to Tokyo to Oklahoma…an interesting story which plays itself out in her found objects, metal and clay collages. Enjoy the pictures and we’ll fill in the rest of the story as we discover it.

On the Fritz

Joyce Fritz is one of those polymer artists without a site (sigh). Luckily Susan Rose found Joyce’s work in the Niche Magazine catalog and brought it to my attention. Joyce is famous for her exquisite bugs…take a look.

Friday’s post and video clip generated a lot of interest. As SL Savarick points out, the video is from an up and coming studio in NYC called 1st Avenue Machine. You’ll be seeing a lot of their work, I’m sure. Here’s how RES magazine describes this piece which is the video for the music "Sixes Last" by Alias.

Reflecting Arvind Palep’s fascination with the disappearing boundaries between organic and constructed life, the video questions the long-term effects of widespread genetic engineering while simultaneously creating a gorgeous array of futuristic life forms. …the clip depicts strangely familiar, remarkably active plants with perfectly formed petals and stems, moving to the song’s beat.

Polymer Meets Photoshop

It’s a weird Friday so I’m going with this theme…weird. Organic meets polymer clay. The effects are computer-generated but it looks very much like polymer.

Doesn’t this short video (click here and then press the arrow to start it) just remind you of FordForlano pieces? Lindly’s pods and tendrils? Jeffrey Dever?

The new Google video stuff is exciting and I’m absolutely thrilled at the possibilities. Hang onto your hats, ladies and gents, there’s some interesting stuff ahead.

A mind-stretching Friday. Call me crazy. Have a lovely weekend.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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