Here are three new sites for your viewing pleasure. Holland's Annette Duburg (her necklace is at the left) hasn't been featured here and I ran across her lovely work at Ravensdale. She also appears in the The Art of Polymer Clay book.

Michelle Petelinz recently appeared on my radar as well. She embellishes boxes and masks and mirrors with polymer clay.

Colorado's Janis Holler's site came to my attention compliments of Crystal Gourdine. Janis' career history shows a high geek factor, she's an electrical engineer with wide-ranging interests and artwork. I'm fascinated by the number of scientists, engineers and other geek-types who are attracted to polymer clay.

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  • reply Michelle ,

    Hi Cynthia,
    Thanks for the mention, and the link. My last name is a difficult one to spell and pronounce: Petelinz, pronounced Pet-LINZ–blame it on my husband’s grandfather!

    • reply Michelle ,

      And… I hit the submit button too soon by mistake…a note about my work: all of my masks are created with polymer clay, then embellished with beads, shells, acrylic paint, fabric, etc. and placed on wooden surrounds or within wooden shadow boxes which often are decorated with polymer clay pieces and borders.
      Thanks again.

      Leave a comment



      • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

        On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

        You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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