FimoSaique’s stringing

No dog days here. The weather is so lovely that I haven’t wanted to sit in front of the computer and neither do you.

FimoSaique is a one-stop polymer clay link that will get you over the Wednesday hump and back to work or play in a jiffy. (Here it is already translated into English.)

Helene K of FimoSaique has been successfully experimenting with flat button disks, stringing them in every way imaginable. One scroll down her page and you’ll have a whole new outlook. And you’ll see glimpses of her French countryside as well.

Picarello’s prototypes

A little more from Julie Picarello. She’s bravely added her latest polymer clay experiments to her website. Julie’s returned to her job designing integrated circuits and her studio work may slow down as a result.

These are her prototype pieces for classes at the Fall Foilage Clay Festival in Wisconsin. "I bought a bunch of gorgeous silks from Class Act Designs and students will be mixing clay for mokume gane stacks that match the silks," Julie explains.

In the August/September issue of Beadwork Magazine the editor interviews Julie as the featured beadmaker.

Join the National Polymer Clay Guild Team

NPCG president Judy Belcher and her crew of officers have done a gold-medal job of taking the national (now international) guild to new heights. But this is a relay event and the baton must be handed to a new team of NPCG officers.

The new group will have the support of an executive director plus past and current officers to help realize their vision, their ideas. The same skills you use to create and problem solve in the studio can be used to impact a worldwide community of artists. Read Judy’s tell-all and the list of positions to figure out where you’d fit best. Then submit your nomination. There are only two weeks left and NPCG needs you.

The six open NPCG positions include: President, VP Education & Outreach, Treasurer, Recording Secretary, Guild Liaison, International Guild Liaison. Write Julie Picarello for more information.

As long as you’re getting paperwork out of the way, don’t miss the chance to share free NPCG space at the ACRE show. The deadline for application is September 10.

Julie and Judy are mindful of your need for eye-candy and sent along these sweet things to seal the deal:

Just back from touching base with the Euro contingent, Judy Belcher was stunned by the energy and vitality of the polymer clay art there as sampled in the work from Spain’s Ana Belchi.

Julie Picarello sent along a link to fellow Clayville California Guild officer, Maureen Thomas.

A long-time button collector, Maureen was creating a polymer clay tile bracelet based on a Gwen Gibson design and found that her elastic was too thick to knot and pull back into the drill hole. She grabbed a button to use as a clasp and made it a focal point of the bracelet. Check out her can-do approach to polymer on her Flickr site and blog.

It’s a can-do Monday.

Caning for fall


These autumn leaf polymer clay canes by Dora Arsenault caught my eye. This is someone who likes to cane! Can it be time for fall leaves? Look at her Flickr site for more examples. Her blog shows off some great pictures from a recent Sarah Shriver class.

Cane slice buttons make the perfect finishing touch for these winter hats that Suzy Peabody (I think that’s her real name) is stockpiling for fall and winter craft shows. She makes them from felt, fleece and recycled sweaters. See how she embellished her spice rack with polymer clay too!

My son keeps a sharp eye out for anything fimo/techno for me and spotted these Blackberry polymer cane earrings, quite a complex undertaking, by Barb Feldman featured on the Gizmodo and GeekSugar sites.

There are so many caners in cyberspace that it’s been hard to select just a few this week. Enjoy your late summer weekend.

Canes recycled as extrusions

Cane work got you frustrated? Germany’s Andrea Will “varUni7” suggests that you put leftovers in the extruder and have fun! This dramatic example is the result and she’s shows additional experiments and designs on her Flickr site.

One of the most appealing aspects of our craft is that materials can be used and reused. Even baked items can be salvaged by recovering and rebaking them.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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