Tatana’s colors

Spain’s Natalia García de Leániz (Tatana) adds a colorful end to our week with these polymer clay slices sewn onto a braided leather necklace and, below, faux heishi strands.

I’ve banked lots of ideas this week and am anxious to get back into my studio right after I spend the weekend gabbing with my visiting siblings and children.

The Thanksgiving dishes are done, the turkey leftovers are ready for leisurely grazing. Have a great weekend.

Polymer clay for Thanksgiving

Christi Freisen’s “Face in the Crowd” polymer clay wall sculpture is my all-time Thanksgiving favorite because it epitomizes what my house looks like on this feast day (28 for turkey dinner) and makes me smile.

It also reminds me of what I’m thankful for…the polymer clay community. We’ve collected an interesting bunch of artists from around the world in three short years.

I’m thankful for your continued participation in this site and inspired by the work that you bring to it. Thank you. And happy Thanksgiving.

Cozzi and Dustin on winning and perservering

Louise Fischer Cozzi’s polymer clay “Wholely Necklace Belt” was awarded first place in the clay category of the Bead Society competition and is on display at The Bead Museum in Washington DC.

The piece can be worn as a double necklace (shown here), as a very long single necklace, or as a belt. The clasp is fun and almost impossible to find.

In addition, two “think” pieces appeared today to ponder as the turkey brines. The first from Kathleen Dustin on persevering in lean times and via Libby Mills, a link to an Alicia Tormey post on motivation.

Aharoni’s polymer floating effect

Valerie Aharoni recently updated her site and added a blog. In this post she talks about baking polymer clay beads right onto wire (or bead thread) to get that floating effect. No crimp beads! Such a simple, elegant solution. (I know that Valerie’s not the first to do this. It caught my eye.)

Look at the textured beads, like this globe, on her Flickr site as well.

Why is it that I discover things I’d like to try when I’m least able to get to the studio…what with preparations for T-day?

I’m also thinking about Lorrene Davis’ theory that the size of a woman’s jewelry is directly proportional to her age. I looked at my visiting daughter’s tiny delicate pieces and wondered if Lorrene was on to something.

Birnco’s riot of color

I’d love to sit down and try some of the beads that Belinda (birnco) has been working on during her first year with polymer clay. The technique looks simple (an extrusion/mokume gane combination) and the effect is stunning.

She’s got a great sense of color that makes the end result luminous, improving as she’s progressed through the year. This riot of color is a good way to start the week.

My daughter’s here to visit and help with Thanksgiving festivities. Maybe we can sneak a couple of hours off to play in the studio like we used to.

Note: Carol Simmons gives a few more clues about reducing her cane with help from the microwave. Scroll way down in the comments on her post and you’ll see her response.

Frame’s polymer adaptation

Vacation mate Jan Frame strung and restrung the polymer clay disks she had created in a range of colors. She was dissatisfied with the weight of the finished necklaces and dismayed by her stash of beads that simply wouldn’t do what she wanted.

She restrung them again. This time they were in an 8′ strand that she hung from a tree in the New Mexico sun where they looked bright and sculptural. We’re encouraging her to try using the sculpture as a rain chain.

We’ve experimented, adapted and had fun with polymer this week. Adios, New Mexico.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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