Technology and polymer

Several readers have recommended the polymer Jiggly Wiggly Robots by Florida’s M. Held who is an illustrator as well. I’m tickled that she converts her robots into fabric at Spoonflower and creates illustrations for stock image sites. She also offers a clever tip for reducing fingerprints on polymer. (Christie Wright and others sent the link along.)

And as long as we’re talking clever technology, take a look at Betsy Baker’s online Lookbook. It’s a catalog of her latest work that she uploaded free through Issuu.com. Read how she did it here. Nice marketing!

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  • reply Calum McFarlane ,

    I’ve found other ways to remove fingerprints which I haven’t found in books. One for unbaked clay and one for baked clay.

    Unbaked clay: Use artist’s turpentine, or (preferably) low odour solvent. Rub or brush gently with a cotton bud or paintbrush. This really softens the clay and temporarily completely changes its structure and workability. Not only can you brush away fingerprints, but gently closing seams and sculpting fine details becomes easy.

    Baked clay: Use a cotton bud or something similar and rub high strength Acetone over fingerprints and other imperfections. Acetone will deteriorate the top surface and rub away the prints. Acetone is the main ingredient in nail polish remover, but that will probably contain a lot of water and might not work. High purity Acetone is readily available on the internet and ebay.

    You might not use the term ‘cotton bud’ in America and Canada. They’re the things you clean your ears with.

    • reply HerArtSheLoves ,

      LOVE THOSE methods! You should share with Indie Smiles too, spread the love… or rather the hate of finger prints! *puts on cape and flies off to make more robots*

      • reply Technology and polymer | PolymerClayLand ,

        […] Technology and polymer Posted in polymer clay Tags: canada, ears, fine details, fingerprints, nail polish remover « Will putting a metallic silver acrylic paint on black polymer clay make the finished product look silver? You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. […]

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