PCDaily doesn’t often stray off topic but Meg Hannan’s fabric jewels are too close to our way of thinking to ignore. Picture millefiori using fabric, beads and glue instead of polymer.

If you like to cane, your brain may overheat as you cruise through her beautiful photos and videos. And if you spend more time than you should on her site, you can blame Jana Roberts Benzon for sending us the link.

Vacation detour

I’m visiting my new grandson this week…the absolute best early holiday present. Expect short, sweet, sentimental posts. I begin with this little ornament from Lisa Haldeman. Here’s the original link.

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  • reply dayle doroshow ,

    Throughout the 1990,s I did a fine craft show every Dec with Meg. I remember well (after you jogged my memory Cynthia with this post) her fabric millifiore jewelry- truly amazing!

    • reply jana ,

      Thanks for sharing Meg’s work with everyone, Cynthia — you weren’t the only one who had to listen to me blather on about her this weekend….daughter-in-law (since she lives with me) was pulled into perusing her website as well. It’s rare that I click every link on a website because I just don’t have time to get sucked into the cyber-vortex, but I did just that on Meg’s site. So much to see and read..and she, herself, seems like a kick!

      • reply Dede Leupold ,

        I had the fortune of meeting up with her when we did the Embellishment show in Portland (or Bead & Button). I had to purchase one of her pieces…incredible!

        • reply amy wasserman ,

          i have one of meg’s pins. they are awesome!!!

          • reply Cassy Muronaka ,

            I bought one of Meg’s pins years and years ago. Her work really is a source of inspiration. Every time I pull it out, I get lost in it.

            • reply Marcie ,

              The one thing I wanted to know was what does she cut them with, and darn she’s not telling. Oh well I’m not switching to fiber anytime soon. It sounds like her secrets took a long time to develop, and she should keep them.

              • reply jeanniek ,

                This is like a colorful slice of heaven.

                • reply Ingrid ,

                  As I enjoy working with fibers as much as with clay, I love Meg’s wonderful work. Amazing jewelry. It sure sparks ideas for my felt work and polymer clay, and now I’m wondering even more how I could possibly blend the two.

                  • reply amy wallace ,

                    I bought some of Meg’s earrings in Nashville about 10 years ago aat a quilt show and she would not budge on her technique, especially in cutting. I don’t blame her. My earrings have held together perfectly over the decade. Strong stuff, and so beautiful. When I wear them, people ask me if it’s my polymer work!

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                    • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

                      On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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