Tackling scrap polymer

Lynda Moseley makes simple pieces from her polymer scrap every so often saying, “There is something very cathartic about marbling, isn’t there? It’s not technical, not complicated, just a few minutes of fun grouping together color combinations to see what you get.” She cuts 2-inch squares from the best results, often stripes, and turns them into finished earrings.

Of course, her leftovers include a mixture of what she calls her “comfort clay” colors. She admits to having a separate Butt Uglies Jar for reject colors.

“I would be happy with a roomful of translucent clay and alcohol ink. Really, I could live the rest of my life just using those; and as long as Ranger doesn’t run out of walnut stain distressed embossing powder, I’m set,” she admits. Look at the tricks she performs with those few supplies here and here.

Is this your week to use up, clean up and pare down?

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  • reply claire maunsell ,

    Lynda is a mine of helpful information and her work is great! You must go through her Flickr photostream and marvel! Don’t get lost there…

    • reply Lynda Moseley ,

      My goodness! What a nice surprise to wake up to this morning! Thank you so much for the feature, Cynthia. I have to go call my mother and tell her the butt uglies jar made it to the big time. She’ll be thrilled, as am I. You are the best!

      Thank you, too, Claire. You are one of my clay heroes, you know. I can’t tell you how much your lovely comment means to me. You are awesome!

      • reply Susan O'Neill ,

        I agree with Claire – rubbing elbows with Lynda in our guild helped me to bump my crafts(wo)manship up by several notches. And I, too, like to use what I call the “trimmings” from mokume gane stacks for smaller coordinating components.

        • reply J Williams ,

          Lynda’s work is always great. She also has some great tutorials on her Etsy site. My favorite is the Faux Jade Tutorial. Her faux jade is more realitic than others. The tutorials are very easy to follow. I don’t know where she keeps coming up with the fantastic ideas. I really like the reptile eye beads she had a while back, especially the purple one. I don’t think it is still on her site though. If there is a way to do something, Lynda will find out how. I’m just waiting for her next tutorial.
          John

          • reply artybecca ,

            I love Lynda’s work. She was one of the first people I followed on flickr and I always love to see what new things she posts. She is endlessly inventive!

            • reply JuLee ,

              I am so happy to see you featuring Lynda’s work. She is one of my favorite PC artists, and an all around great person. She writes great tuts…. I LOVE the textured beads I was able to make with her tut on them. I just wish I lived closer to her so we could get together in person.

              • reply Loretta ,

                I too am a huge fan of Lynda’s work – esp. the heavily textured Asian looking beads!! And like Lynda I always use my “scraps” for marbling or for making “linoleum”. It ensures that the beads will co-ordinate nicely with the first run beads.

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                • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

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