Going too far with polymer

Neumaier on PCDaily

Kathrin Neumaier tantalizes us one more time with her translucent polymer tricks. In this experiment her faux amber Honigtropfen (Honey Drops) beads are made from uncolored Pardo clay.

Kathrin pushes the boundaries as she takes the material beyond it’s recommended baking temperature. In the comments she hints that she baked the colorless clay, “…too long and too hot” to achieve the golden color. The black dots indicate that she nearly went too far.

What would happen if you pushed your work too far this week?

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  • reply delphine ,

    Too far ? Well it happened last week-end : too much sanding, couldn’t use my right arm any more the day after ;))

    • reply Randee M Ketzel ,

      I love the ‘deeply cured ‘ look; with the proper safety precautions it has its merits.

      • reply Candice Bishop ,

        I burned something for the first (and second) time last week. I wouldn’t be brave enough to try this EVER, now, but I *do* love the way it looks like someone strung honey drops together. Lovely work đŸ™‚

        • reply Laura ,

          WOW! and looking at all of the other creations on site were just as amazing too!

          • reply genevieve williamson ,

            Maybe there isn’t a “too far”… there’s just learning. (as long as you have good ventilation of course đŸ˜‰

            • reply Lorrene ,

              Wow. Thanks for this post.

              • reply Jana ,

                I agree with Genevieve…practice proper ventilation, and “hot” baking can allow you to achieve all kinds of things!

                • reply Jana ,

                  Oh, and these beads are gorgeous…I love the ambered look translucent can take on..

                • reply Lynda Moseley ,

                  I routinely bake Pardo trans at 315-325 degrees. After experiencing problems with Premo clay for the past two months, I was told by one of their R&D people that it is okay to bake it at a higher temp and for longer periods to make it stronger. Perhaps it is time we take a new look at temps and times for all the brands.

                  • reply Sandra D. ,

                    Amazing honey drops beads. Do you have a tutorials for sell?

                    • reply Meredith ,

                      Cynthia Toops used to do this with transparent Fimo because it made great ‘amber’… It isn’t really a good thing to do – especially if you have a canary or like to breathe well.

                      • reply Wendy Jorre de st Jorre ,

                        This is fantastic……I’m gonna try it….good thing my oven is outside on the verandah!

                        • reply Vanessa Lourenço ,

                          Cool! đŸ˜€

                          • reply Margaret Heizenrader ,

                            These “honey drops” are absolutely beautiful. This artist’s work is stunning!

                            I’m going to order some Pardo translucent and see what I can come up with!

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