From Germany

We bumped into Bettina Welker's work back in March. Since then she's added some interesting pieces to her site. Bettina is a graphic designer and her polymer clay work is as cleverly designed and neatly executed as her web sites.

Bettina's site has an English translation (whew) and I'm just guessing that she looks after the German guild's site which is a true beauty.

Back to School

Jeff Dever's pieces are organic, brilliantly colored, flawlessly constructed and impeccably designed. At Ravensdale a container of Jeff's spit, rumored to be his secret ingredient, was auctioned off at a stunning price. I wish I'd taken his class because his students produced some great work and gained some valuable insights.

Students in the Ravensdale color classes led by Lindly Haunani and Maggie Maggio couldn't believe how quickly they had learned to replicate colors using the basic primary colors and their own special "mud." Here you see Switzerland's Nadja Fuenfsinn holding her collage in her left hand and her mirror frame covered in polymer clay in her right.

Judy Kuskin's students were so proud of the metal work and polymer studies tried in her class that they wore their creations the entire week.

A class from a polymer clay master can stretch your talents and take your skill level to new heights. Get back to school this fall.

Recycling

Julia Sober recycles. From automotive fuses to computer parts, Julia sees beauty and utility in the most mundane materials and incorporates them into her polymer clay work.

Scrapbooking staples become bails. Grommets embellish bead holes. Julia's shapes are as playful and unexpected as her hardware. Pieces move. Messages appear and disappear.

Combining her talent for color with her ability to assemble Julia Sober comes up with some exciting and winning combinations (including her "best of show" in the recent NPCG show).

Toops Site

Cynthia Toops and Dan Adams have launched a site about their works. It shows only a smattering of their works and if you drag the images to your machine and view them, you'll get some sense of the scale of Cynthia's micromosaics. It's difficult to imagine working so small. The image at the left is ring-size. Click on it to view the larger-than-life version.

Thanks to Judy Kuskin who discovered the site and passed the link along.

Fiber Finds

Milwaukee's Debra DeWolff started out as a fiber artist, adding polymer to her repertoire a few years back. At Ravensdale she showed these very popular bracelets that combine felt and polymer clay beads. The felt beads are large and the colors bright…definitely diva attire.

Debra says that her web site will soon be in the works. In the meanwhile, you'll have to settle for these pictures or contact her for more information.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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