Tips and Tricks

Smelly stones

Sorlien on PCDaily

You may not be drawn to Sarah Sorlien’s polymer imitative rock but there are plenty of dogs who love it!

This Philadelphia physician makes Odor Stones, hollow polymer stones that are used as hiding places for dog training and competitions. She creates these functional faux stones for a canine sport called Nosework. Now you understand the holes.

Sarah says she learned rock basics from my online class and then added her own magic ingredient – cement. “Add a little liquid clay if it gets too powdery,” she suggests. It’s cheaper than embossing powders and was already available in the garage. “Don’t get it near your eyes,” physician Sarah cautions. See more of her examples on Pinterest.

An interesting diversion from jewelry on a Thursday. PCD took an interesting diversion too and stopped posting on schedule. Technological spring fever!

Big art challenge

Kilgast on PCDaily

Miniaturist Stéphanie Kilgast (PetitPlat) has been on a steady diet of polymer fruits and veggies for 70 days. Can she possibly keep this up for an entire year?

She posts her new food sculptures almost daily on Facebook where you can follow her progress and cheer her on.

“I’m starting to feel a bit tired with this daily challenge,” Stephanie admits. “It is a lot of work to handle and I can’t seem to be able to make them in advance, say make 3-4 veggies in one session. Ah well, I need to get a grip about this, otherwise I’m going to exhaust myself.”

Kilgast on PCDaily

Why miniatures? “Miniatures are usually appreciated because they make you think you can put the world in your pocket,” says Stephanie and the colors are endlessly inspiring. She also ventures into other subjects including a line of City and Galaxy jewelry.

Read more about this French artist on Instagram, Pinterest and Flickr. Yep, she’s got a whole page of tutorials in case you’re inspired and you may enjoy this older video about her work.

Wedgwood imitations

Powers on PCDaily

Heather Powers’ Wedgwood Pottery-inspired beads contain promises of a new season. Her imitative Jasperware beads feature raised white relief sculpture on matte backgrounds in spring colors. Here the Wedgwood beads are paired with leafy designs and topped by birds.

Heather is one busy blogger! Tonight she presents her tips for Promoting Your Jewelry Business Online to the Baltimore Bead Society. She’s gathered her source material, over 300 articles for artists/sellers, into one hugely helpful Creative Biz Pinterest board.

She operates multiple shops and teaches on cruises, workshops, bootcamps and retreats. She writes books. She blogs and connects like crazy. Go marvel at her talents and don’t miss her free jewelry tutorials!

Polymer germs

Ortiz de la Torre on PCDaily

Madrid’s Silvia Ortiz de la Torre has Germs. That’s what’s she’s calling this series of post earrings (or at least that’s how Google translates it).

They’re pillow shaped and covered with striped veneers. The corduroy texture comes from the fine threads on a bolt rolled across the unbaked surface. That’s an easy addition to pop into your toolbox.

Ortiz de la Torre on PCDaily

Look closely and you’ll see subtle blends in Silvia’s bright stripes. As a wearer of post earrings, I appreciate her attention to small interesting shapes. See more of Silvia on Facebook, Flickr, Pinterest and Etsy.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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