Tips and Tricks

Tokens from scrap

Maunsell on PCDaily

Jewel-like scrap hearts from Quebec’s Claire Maunsell get us in the proper holiday mood. What mementos and love tokens will you make this week?

Claire says she’ll soon offer a tutorial about the way she uses her scrap to get the dramatic effects you see here.

Maunsell on PCDaily

In the meanwhile, you can learn about her methods of using Pan pastels, inks, paints and some unusual tools with translucent Pardo clay on her new Craftcast class.

Watch how she teases the clay into shape (she was a glass artist before polymer), and applies layers and layers of texture and color until she’s pleased with the effect.

I learned a new way to anchor the probe on the thermometer. It’s often the little tricks you learn in a class that come in most handy. See more of Claire on Flickr, her site, Facebook and in her online Zibbet and Etsy galleries.

 

Secrets of the heart

galchen_orly_fuchs_hearts

Orly Fuchs Galchen pursues hollow polymer forms and she’s come up with light, bright empty hearts. Her Facebook  and Flickr pages and her Etsy shop are filled with examples in many styles including these wrapped with lovely bands of graduated color.

Orly swears that she only uses polymer. No filling with sugar, salt, paper, cotton or foil. No making two halves and gluing. No double baking. You have to buy her tutorial to learn her secret or be resigned to a heavy heart. (I couldn’t resist the pun.)

Making five easy pieces

McNall on PCDaily

Page McNall added a free 2-page photo tutorial on Flickr for her segmented polymer bead necklaces last month. Now that the holiday hubbub is over, let’s give her instructions a whirl. She shows how on page 1 and page 2.

She blends color gradients into short thick plugs which she threads onto on a knitting needle. She nurses and shapes the plug, removes it from the needle and cuts it into five segments.  She gently refines the shape of the cut pieces and places them back on the needle to bake.

mcnall_tutorial

After they’re baked Page distresses the beads and adds color accents with shoe polish. Mounted onto short lengths of wire, the segmented beads are then arranged into necklaces. Her pictures make it all quite clear. Follow Page on Facebook and see her influences on Pinterest. (PCD follower Patrice Pfeiffer thought you’d want to see this and I agreed.)

A polymer mashup

Holt on PCDaily

Syndee Holt calls last week’s free tutorial on the Sculpey site the Meisha Squish but doesn’t the Meisha Mash sound better? 

Syndee and Meisha Barbee devised this method as they sat at the same worktable cleaning up their scrap. It’s sloppy, fast mokume gane with the best colors (Syndee even provides the recipes) and easy steps.

What a way to ease us into the week! See Meisha’s polymer on her Pinterest site and Facebook. Here’s more from Syndee on her blog, Instagram and Facebook.

 

 

Bury your beads

Mayorova on PCDaily

As we approach our usual end-of-year studio pare down and purge period, we might take a hint from Spain’s Tanya Mayorova and bury our beads!

Tanya doodles with extruded strips of clay set on edge. Stacked against each other, the strips dip and bend and wind around an assortment of beads and baubles. They change color as they move along. The effect is like water flowing past pebbles in a stream.

Do you have some beads you love and can’t let go of? This collage of treasures might be just the thing. Look closely at Tanya’s methods on Etsy, Flickr, and Facebook (and in prior PCD features).

A tutorial under your tree

Lehocky on PCDaily

Dr. Ron Lehocky apologized for being late in sending PCD readers this free holiday tree tutorial. He explains that he’s been busy making over 1100 heart trees since November. He’s turned his signature heart upside down and added some bling in keeping with the season.

lehocky_frozen_blue_trees

Ron offers the tutorial as a thank you gift to the polymer community who have so wholeheartedly supported the heart project and the Fimo 50 effort which both benefit the Kids Center. He’s also celebrating having made 33,150 hearts. (Can you imagine?)

Ron extruded so much green polymer that he tired of the color and created a blue Frozen series of trees. They sold out quickly. Unwrap your present from Ron at this link. Follow him on Facebook where you can see his fans decked out fashionably in hearts.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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