Tips and Tricks

Spring leaf cane

Shvat on PCDaily

Spring makes us look more closely at leaves and Israel’s Tami Shvat gives us a lovely interpretation in polymer to study.

She prepares a cane of variegated greens (sort of like camouflage) and then adds black veins that feel just right. Tami intends to mix these leaves with flowers for a larger millefiori cane but the leaf cane stands on its own.

Tami thinks like a caner (she has a cane brain) and brings her watercolor sensibility to polymer. Go see what she’s done on Etsy, Flickr and Facebook.

Ready-to-go earrings

Natalia Garcia de Leaniz is one clever and efficient artist. Look closely here and you’ll see that she built these polymer earrings right onto the findings. Her method is perfect for those of us who have trouble assembling and finishing earrings.

She filled the earwire’s bezel with clay and textured it then wrapped slim strips over the background clay and the bezel. She tops her construction with a small bowl shape with a bright shiny interior. Bake and wear!

Donna Kato shows these earwires on her favorite findings page and other vendors offer them as well.

Natalia will teach her tricks at the July 30 – August 2 Clay Carnival in Las Vegas.You can find more about this Spanish artist on Facebook, CraftArtEdu and Pinterest. Her free tool tutorial explains how she builds texture tools.

Nothing like a trick to start the week right!

Smelly stones

Sorlien on PCDaily

You may not be drawn to Sarah Sorlien’s polymer imitative rock but there are plenty of dogs who love it!

This Philadelphia physician makes Odor Stones, hollow polymer stones that are used as hiding places for dog training and competitions. She creates these functional faux stones for a canine sport called Nosework. Now you understand the holes.

Sarah says she learned rock basics from my online class and then added her own magic ingredient – cement. “Add a little liquid clay if it gets too powdery,” she suggests. It’s cheaper than embossing powders and was already available in the garage. “Don’t get it near your eyes,” physician Sarah cautions. See more of her examples on Pinterest.

An interesting diversion from jewelry on a Thursday. PCD took an interesting diversion too and stopped posting on schedule. Technological spring fever!

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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