Tips and Tricks

Coincidental polymer art

Watkins on PCDaily

Rebecca Watkins simplifies our Wednesday and reminds us that it’s still possible to create colorful, cheery, fashionable art by stringing big round polymer balls on a cable.

Artybecca’s beads are colored with dots of shared colors and textured with circles. A dark wash of paint brings out the lines.

The colors are “coincidental” (as she explains on her blog) and happen to match everything in her closet. She wears them here.

Nothing forced or fussy about this necklace. No laborious techniques. A smooth finish and a nice polish and they’re good to go.

Take a deep breath, lighten up on the expectations, and have some fun. See more of Rebecca on Facebook and Flickr. You may enjoy reading about how she “blew up” a perfectly good cane to get back to the big patterns she prefers.

Sleight of hand in polymer

Leonini on PCDaily

Italy’s Cecilia Leonini plays an optical trick as she tinkers with the illusions created by painter Victor Vasarely. Could she create a 2D piece with a 3D effect by using color and hand cut lines?

What you may think are beads at the left are quite flat pieces of polymer colored and grooved to fool the eye.

Cecilia’s teaser may give your brain a Monday stretch. Follow her tricks on Flickr, Etsy and Facebook.

Leonini on PCDaily

Bowled over

Holt on PCDaily

Sometimes it’s good to get nervous about trades among friends and, guess what, we all do it. That mixture of fear and competition can motivate us to try harder.

Even longtime artist and Sculpey brand ambassador Syndee Holt admits that this was her second attempt at making little 2 1/2″ diameter polymer bowls for an upcoming swap. She wanted to get her new design just right so she scrapped the first batch and kept going until she felt comfortable. Let the guessing begin about how she achieved this multi-color stone-like effect.

Kim Arden’s tell-all

In the September/October issue of Polymer Cafe magazine, Kim Arden reveals how she creates her summer flower pendants. Along with a profile written by Trina Williams, Kim includes a complete tutorial.

Arden on

She shows how to stack bright and translucent cane slices over a scrap background to build pendants that have color, depth and attitude. Here’s PCD’s first look at Kim’s design from last year.

Read more about Kim on Facebook and her site. See what Syndee’s experimenting with on her blog and on the Sculpey site.

On the hunt for polymer

Millican on PCDaily

Heather Millican (Swoondimples) beams and shows her dimples as she explains her methods in a free tell-all video tutorial on YouTube.

Heather reveals where she found the perfect brushes (makeup ones from Target), the best glue and wax, her choice for transfer paper and stamps. She leaves nothing out.

The polymer charms and pendants sell briskly on Heather’s Etsy shop not only because of the techniques that she’s developed but also because she brings gentle words and an openess to her pieces which make what she creates all the more irresistable.

You can see more of her on Facebook and Pinterest. You may end up like me saying, “I’ll have what she’s having.”

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.

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