Tips and Tricks

Salads and polymer

Jane Cox turns simple wooden kitchen utensils into special gifts on PolymerClayDaily.com

The UK’s Jane Cox (JaneLovesCreativity) turns simple wooden kitchen utensils into special gifts.

She winds comfy colors of extruded polymer strings around the handles, smooths the clay and polishes it to a shine after curing.

Imagine a friend smiling as she stirs dinner or serves salad with the spoon that reminds her of you.

There’s plenty of time to create these before the holidays, right?

We’ll be peeking into Tory Hughes Santa Fe atelier this week on StudioMojo. See how she surrounds herself with samples of luscious colors before she begins. Join us!

 

Swapping with style

Joan Tayler's ball chain idea makes swapping fun again on PolymerClayDaily

Ohio neighbor, Nancy Nearing, traveled to Vancouver to visit her daughter and to meet up with Joan Tayler who has a thriving polymer business at the Granville Island Public Market (and on Etsy).

Joan sent PCD readers a super new idea for small art to trade and collect.  If inchies and totems and bowls have lost their swap thrill in your group, consider her new method.

She recommends baking beads directly on short lengths of ball chain (1 1/2″ or so). Sandwich the chain between two slices of cane or devise your own style.  Join the individual pieces together with connectors and make them into necklaces, bracelets, keychains, whatever.

Joan made all these beads on this sample. Beads coming from far and wide might look very different.

Once your group agrees on a color and size of ball chain, you have an easy swap. Brilliant, eh? Thanks, Joan and Nancy!

StudioMojo heads west! Travel along and see who we run into. Join us!

 

 

What goes ’round

Patricia Roberts-Thompson reinvents the wheel on PolymerClayDaily.com

This pendant by Patricia Roberts-Thompson is the result of her playing with Samantha Burroughs’ Oyster Watercolor tutorial. Its loose circles and watery colors make your eyes dive right in.

Patricia added distressing powders to her color combinations and enlarged the design adding a bail fabricated from the same batch.

Samantha admits that she developed her clever tutorial by studying Maggie Maggio’s Watercolor Torn Paper instructions from some years back.

No criticism here! I enjoy the resonances from years back and smile at the progression. Ideas get updated, rejuvenated and taken in new directions that keep our craft healthy and vibrant. It’s also great to see each artist credit her source. Thank you for playing nicely and showing such good manners.

Sage polymer

Sage from Julia Tarasenkova on PolymerClayDaily.com

Julia Tarasenkova has studied and drawn yarrow, cornflower, wild onion and other vegetation in her Russian landscape. She reproduces them in polymer and turns them into jewelry as with this Sage necklace.

Julia shares a step-by-step of one of her wildflower necklaces and more on Facebook.

What beauties are blooming or drying in your landscape as the seasons change?

 

 

The appeal of build-your-own

Melanie West adds a new twist to her Bones necklace on PolymerClayDaily

Melanie West wore her new Bones necklace at Synergy4 in August. One night it was a long chain, the next she quickly reconfigured it as a choker and bracelet.

Melanie West transforms a necklace into a choker and bracelet on PolymerClayDaily.com

The genius of Melanie’s design is the way the links are connected with o-rings held in place by the bulbous ends of each snakey bead.

A more recent version of Melanie’s necklace shown at left includes curled sections, a play on vine-like necklaces by Maggie Maggio. In true Synergy spirit, Georg Dinkel joined in and suggested adding contrasting dots on the end of each link! And she’s not finished experimenting.

Has Melanie’s build-your-own bright idea started your wheels turning?

Join us over at StudioMojo where we mull over the new designs and keep the synergy going every Saturday morning. 

 

 

Monster Monday

If you tracked monster storms all weekend you may be in the mood to purge your world of all its monsters.

Monster Monday courtesy of Anthony (Ace of Clay) on PolymerClayDaily.com

Watch as Michigan’s Anthony, Ace of Clay, turns his demons into pins. With ferocious teeth, of course.

Some texture, a few wrinkles and a dusting of dark shadows around the eyes heightens the ominous look. Some have sunlight color-changing eyes, others glow in the dark.

Anthony also keeps switch plates, phone cases and sculpted figures in stock. If you’re squeamish, you’ll prefer his colorful imitative sugar skulls. Look on Instagram, Etsy, and Facebook.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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