Tips and Tricks

Temptation

Oregon’s Marcella Brooks is tempting us with a new liquid polymer transfer technique. The pictures on her photo site are intriguing and you can see a sample in this week’s slide show. Marcella’s liquid polymer expertise was also recognized in one of Polymer Clay Central’s challenges.

Says Marcella, "I’m still refining techniques and finding new applications. I’m able to coax sturdy but flexible design elements out of liquid polymer clay which normally wouldn’t be interested in doing much more than spreading out into colorful puddles. I wake up wondering what else I can do with it! For PolymerCafe’s upcoming Big Bead challenge, I submitted images of a 4" hollow bead featuring panels of liquid lace suspended on tulle netting."

This looks like a lovely new twist with great possibilities. Keep Marcella on your "must watch" list.

Trendspotting Monday


Washington artist Pam Sanders signed the guestbook with an intriguing polymer clay piece so naturally I went exploring. Her loose and playful approach is very appealing with a nice sense of balance and color. I wish I could see more of her work.

And Pam gives us another example of that jewelry/sculpture pairing in her "Dream Temple" piece shown here which incorporates a wearable pin into a 5 x 7 collage meant to hang on the wall.

I’m spotting a trend.

Swimming Pool Palette


Polymer clay extrusions are so much fun the first few times you do them. Soon, however, the shapes and color combinations that seemed so magical become boring. It takes a keen and curious mind to push the technique into something fun again.

These extrusions from Germany’s Kerstin Rupprecht reignited my interest. Kerstin’s friend, Ulrike, supplied the tip and says that Kerstin fills the clay gun with varying tints of translucent blues interspersed with thin slices of white. Perhaps it’s her swimming pool colors on this hot summer day that make me ready to dive into extrusions again.

One cane wonder

One translucent polymer clay cane is all that was used to make this spacey, retro earring by Marla Frankenberg. Reduced to several sizes and overlaid on a Skinner blend base, the cane gives the bead a spacey, retro look.

Many of Marla’s beads remind me of batik and other luscious fabrics. She’ll be teaching at Bead and Button this weekend. Here are some pictures from an earlier class and she’ll be teaching her marlafiori at Arrowmont in October. We’ve got scouts out taking pictures at Bead and Button and I hope they snag some treats.

Babyish

They look like polymer clay rosebuds but on closer examination you’ll see that this is a tin covered with babies, a wish box, wanna-be-grandma’s hope chest that I created at Shrine Mont.

What it seems to be filled with these days is my babyish whining about where the time goes. I’m off schedule today. Enjoy this little treat (here’s where I bought the baby face/fairy molds) while I burp and soothe myself into a better humor.

To the Rescue

It’s late and I’m in a mad dash to bring you some mid-week polymer clay inspiration. Who can I count on? Indiana’s Ponsawan Sila!

If you want a bit of Thai culture and family history served with great quick photo tutorials, her site won’t disappoint. I’m loving the ice cream salt beads on this page. She does lovely, unusual things with texture plates and rubber stamps.

Ponsawan saves the day. Read her text and you’ll see the delightful personality that comes through in her art and her web site.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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