Tips and Tricks

Backfilling


I saw pictures from a Carol Blackburn demo given at the San Diego guild’s 2005 Sandy Camp and I couldn’t figure out how this technique was being accomplished.

(To see the demo pix, go to the Sandy Camp pictures and scroll down to her demo.)

Carol’s secret is backfilling. She cuts into raw clay with cutters or blades, bakes and then backfills into the baked clay. Or she makes impressions in the raw clay, bakes and backfills. It’s a simple technique that Carol has taken to a whole new level.

A British guild member, Carol first arrived at Sandy Camp in 2004 when she couldn’t return her airline tickets purchased for the canceled national show that year. She’s been coming back ever since. Carol makes great tassels as well…but that’s for another day.

Spring on Glass

Klew has come up with luscious spring colors in polymer clay cane slices that she applies over glass beads. She also adds polymer embellishments to resin base beads (like these). Check out the ideas in her photo gallery.

Ronna Sarvas Weltman sent me a huge list of links and I think that’s where I found both today’s post and yesterday’s. If I’ve attributed this to the wrong person, let me know. Those photo gallery sites are such huge reservoirs of work that I’d never find these gems without you viewers. Thanks.

Pastel extrusions

It was a tip from Chel Micheline that led me to Tina Voyak. Tina’s simple designs in fresh colors are very appealing.

Taking a cue from our glass bead friends, polymer artists have been using extruded polymer in interesting ways…coiled and cut, sliced and applied…often reminiscent of lampworked beads.

Heart and Soul

All the store merchandise tells us that we’re approaching Valentine’s Day. If you’re in the mood to get your valentines ready, here’s a simple heart from Diane Villano. You can even find a “how-to” on the Polymer Cafe site. Sometimes simple is best.

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Foldover

This "foldover" necklace from Christy Sherman in Connecticut was inspired by a picture in a silver bead catalog. She has a tutorial on her site that explains the process step-by-step. Take a look.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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