Nostalgic

Vermont's Barbara Lang's polymer pieces with found objects have a fascinating nostalgic quality. She uses polymer clay to form rustic findings that capture objects of all shapes. Note how an old key embedded in polymer becomes a finding in the pendant at the right.

Her fondness for faux stone techniques, stamping and photography combined with her flea market finds fill her pieces with secrets and mystery.

And be sure to check out Barbara's studio in the Vermont woods. It looks perfect.

Singing Bowls

New work by Mary Filapek and Lou Ann Townsend (aka maryandlouann) was spotted by Ronna Weltman at a recent show. This work, which they've graciously offered to share here, is a departure from their earlier pieces.

With titles like "scarab" and "singing bowls" and "celestial tones" I sense a story. The work is much more sculptural with a heavier reliance on metal.

You won't see these items on their web site yet! It's a PCDaily exclusive!

Carrotbox

I want to spend the day looking at this site but I have no time. Carrotbox is totally kewl and I hope you can luxuriate there. The author has a "ring thing" and the site contains some of the features I plan to add here in the next few months. A great big thanks to Columbus' Donna Reed, who was reviewed on the site (look at April 5) , for putting me onto this one!

Here's one from Carrotbox. I know it's resin and not polymer but it's a terrific idea. These resin "wobble" rings contain magnets. The detachable magnetic pebbles allow you to pile on whatever sizes and colours suit your mood. This "wearable toy" jewellery is the brainchild of Edinburgh's Kaz Robertson, one third of the Diverse Workshop group of designers.

Polymer Books

On Geraldine Newfry's blog, she shares the slides of her newest handmade books (scroll way down on her page). She's submitted them to Lark for inclusion in 500 Handmade Books. This one's called "Beloved" and is single sheet coptic bound with pages and covers made of polymer clay.

I loved reading through Geraldine's blog, going on virtual retreat with her then looking at all her Flickr pictures. There are so many cool artists with great stories on the web. It's a wonder I get anything done.

Thanks to Margaret Donnelly for the tip. Be sure to check out Margaret's "Sampler."

Kaleidoscopes

Sarah Shriver is directly responsible for many of the kaleidoscope cane freaks out there. Sarah makes it look disceptively easy and few artists reach her level of balance between chaos and control in their work.

As entertainment and practice for those who can't get enough of repeating patterns, I recommend you go to this site and play for a while. Have a great weekend. I'll be on vacation next week and the site will be on auto pilot with some fun posts.

Home Schooling

Can't get out to a class? Try home schooling with DVDs and videos.

Lisa at Polkadot Creations pointed us to some new polymer clay videos by Dayle Doroshow (International Inspirations in Polymer Clay – Volume 1: Provence and Volume 2:China). Take a look at the trailers in either Quicktime or Windows Media. There's a great gallery of Dayle's work on the site too (takes a moment or two to load).

And Weefolk's Maureen Carlson has put out the word that her site's been updated with a new look and updated info.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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