Old and new

Huichol artworks are made using an ancient technique. Seed beads are pressed into a layer of bees wax which has been applied to a form. As you can imagine, the sculptures are quite fragile on warm days or in the sun.

Deanna Moore (tigerpurple) demonstrates a new twist on the ancient art. She presses seed beads into polymer clay. Granted, it's a laborious process but quite clever and more stable.

Sometimes you find interesting techniques in the most unlikely places. Have a delightful weekend.

This ‘n That

I'm in a bit of a rush to get things wrapped up in Ohio so that I can head west on vacation (including two days at Ravensdale). Today's a bit of this and that. I plan to post from the road so that you won't miss a thing.

Facere Gallery in Seattle is exhibiting a polymer display that will accompany the Ravensdale conference. These bracelets from Sara Shriver are in the show.

These chocolates from Lindly Haunani's class won't melt even in this heat…and they look delicious.

Diva Jewelry

Techniques that are such fun to create often become mind-numbingly boring. Take those square extrusions. A professor of fluid dynamics bought a bowl of mine that was inlaid with square extrusions. He excitedly explained the physics of how the colors merged and formed. I was fascinated. After a while, however, they all look the same.

Some artists take these techniques to another level. These "Klimt pins" photos from Donna Kato illustrate the point. She takes a simple technique, renders it in unexpected colors and then pushes it further. In this case, she gave the pieces interesting shapes, added pearls and accented one with a textured layer.

It's that second effort that makes these pieces different from the rest. We must learn to obey that inner voice that says, "Take it farther…keep going"

The Ronna Weltman article in ArtJewelry Magazine was nicely written (I just got my copy) and I loved Steven Ford saying that polymer clay jewelry is "diva jewelry." He's right, of course (his new site is working a bit better today). These colors and styles are not for the shy or faint of heart.

Rave


Here's a bit of a sampling from the Ravensdale conference in Issaquah, Washington which is only a week away. These beads from Barbara Fajardo will be on display in "The Rave." If you can't get to Ravensdale, visit Barbara's site for lots more info.

Or if the conference is just too far away, you might be interested in the Judy Belcher/Kim Cavender workshop in Columbus, Ohio this weekend. Only a few seats remain. Sign up now for an informative polymer weekend with two of polymer clay's most entertaining authors.

 

NPCG Winners

The national guild's second juried exhibit is now on view on their web site. Julia Sober took top awards in both the personal embellishments and the best of show categories.

Since it's a bit tricky to find the pictures, here's the list of links to the Progress and Possibilities exhibit and its winners by category: Personal Embellishments, Figurative Sculpture, Non-figurative Sculpture, Containers, Dolls, Beads and Bead Sets, Alternative Use, Mixed Media, Best of Show.

Cynthia Toop's "Ginko" bracelet which placed third in the personal embellishments category is pictured here. Hope your weekend's a winner!

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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