Darkside Dolls

In my web exploration I came upon some young dark artwork, Darkside Dolls. I loved the energy of this cat by Michelle Steele and think her sculptures are terrific.

After travelling halfway round the world to locate new works, turns out that Michelle is from right here in Ohio.

Sort of a Christmas Grinchy-looking cat, right? Very Leslie Blackford/MoodyWoods-ish. Michelle says she’s putting some new polymer work on her site soon.

Beautiful to Crunch

I spent a good bit of time over the weekend browsing through the online photo sites, flickr and pbase and such. After slogging through a ton of typical polymer work, I happened on some fresh foreign designs.

I ran a young French designer’s site through Altavista Babelfish for translation. What a hoot that was. Many of Magali Thiébaud’s pieces look like candies. The idiom translations are very rough.

"My jewels point out candies, the chocolate, the liquorice and of other sugar refineries. To carry a Croquezmoicreation jewel is to be beautiful to crunch."

Late at night with a glass of wine it’s a surreal experience. I found some interesting Portugese things too. Nothing like other cultures to shake you out of your own design rut and widen your horizons.

I’ve written to Magali Thiébaud to get details about her work but there’s no response yet. Visit Croquezmoicreation.com.

Her Flickr albums contain her most interesting work. Be warned, it’s easy to get lost in the maze of these monster sites and there’s a lot of stuff to wade through. Let me show you the way. Try this page.

Cleaning out…looking ahead

It felt good to take a whole box of unused materials to the guild’s tag sale. End of year cleanout to a good cause. Next year I resolve not to buy the same things over again…glitters and paints and colors that don’t suit me but I might use some day.

I dumped some unsuccessful projects into the trash as well. I remember Kathy Amt telling a class that it was good to empty your studio of discarded projects. These projects nag you and induce guilt. It’s good to get rid of them. Her only rule is that you must know why the project failed before you toss it.

I learn from others’ fine work and I’ve been finding it in the most unlikely places….like this bracelet by Donna Kato that was photographed by Florida’s Nancy Welsh at a workshop earlier this year. Leaf through Nancy’s album of pictures.

Pretty in Pink

Primitive and pretty. Primitive and pink. Ronna Weltman has taken a new tack. (Her new photos might not have gotten posted on her site yet.) This light delicate look is a nice departure from the heavier designs we’re used to in polymer work.

I guess I’m already in the mood for spring.

Judy Belcher’s new book arrived from Amazon yesterday. I’ll feature a few things to entice you in the coming days. It’s filled with pictures that will inspire you. I’m sure the text is informative too but like most of you, I’m hung up on the photos.

Seasonally Speaking

Jack Schwend of Oxford, Alabama began making these elves when he was in the service stationed in Germany and happened across some polymer clay in a hardware store. He bakes his creations a total of 20 times and gives them an incredible high-gloss finish by dipping them at least seven times in a water-based floor sealant.

His site indicates that he's done for the season but you'll want to take a look at his very precise and detailed work. For best viewing, turn the music off.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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