Lentils

I’ve run across Ronna Sarvas Weltman in several magazines and articles. I’m attracted to her wavy lentil disks. She uses them both by themselves and with other, round beads.

Ronna lives in Bellevue, Washington. She works in silver, precious metal clay, polymer clay, glass beads, and other materials. Visit her site.

Crystals

I’m always browsing for designs and ideas. Check out the jewelry in the Ona catalog. It looks an awfully lot like rhinestones in polymer. Nice merging of crystals and mosaics. The description reads "…hand-molded from a patented clay and incrusted with swarovski crystals."

The Ona catalog has inspiring designs in other categories as well. It’s fun to mouse through.

Lorie Follett gets her fabulous rhinestones from rhinestoneguy.com. She says the selection is great and the prices are good. She recommends ordering the sample card to get ideas for sizes and colors.

Faux Drusy

Marie’s faux drusy
Natural drusy

Marie Segal started it at Shrinemont this year. She credits/blames Judith Skinner for starting the faux drusy craze.

Druse refers to a rock surface covered with tiny crystals such as are found inside geodes. Drusy has become popular in the gem world of late.

Drusy materials slowly appeared in the work of noted gem carvers and jewelry designers and, as a result, gained space in gem and jewelry publications.

Marie’s necklace pictured here is made by extruding cord and then making lanyards…like in girl scouts. The end pieces were made separately and baked and then glittered. The lanyard is then attached to the end pieces. The clasp in the center of the flowers is made from 20 gauge wire. Marie recommends glitter from Art Glitter.

French Roundabout

A French polymer clay site led me to California’s Laurie Mika. Her mosaic furniture, boxes and wall art may make you rethink your next project. The colors are bold and bright. Take a look.

While you’re on Laurie’s site, you may want to follow some of her links for inspiration. Be sure to check out the work of Irina Charny, Marie Gibbons and others.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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