More Classes

There are a couple of wonderful class sites to look at today. Oh, just to sit here in chilly Ohio and imagine taking one of Gwen Gibson’s classes (or Dayle Doroshow’s or Dan Cormier’s) in sunny France. And look at the fabulous facility that Barbara McGuire has set up in Buford, Georgia.

If you’re looking for a shot of inspiration and some skill-building, there are plenty of sources out there.

Ravensdale Details

There’s a little more Ravensdale info at this link. And there are a few more pictures to tantalize you. I’ve compiled a bit of their registration and cost information into my own page because it’s still hard to find all the details on their site (you have to read through conversations on their forum) and you’ll probably want to start bankrolling for the event now.

The conference site is 18 miles outside of Seattle, WA. Registration will open April 30 with overseas registrations accepted beginning April 23. The folk beads at the left are by color diva and Ravensdale instructor Maggie Maggio.

What Time Is It?

Oh my goodness, it’s evening and I haven’t posted yet. I hate it when my day job gets in the way of other pleasures. I’ve been rushing too fast and "time" is a good subject to ponder today. Margaret Bernatt’s site was sent to us by another Aussie, Tania McCulloch.

I’d love to know the story about Margaret’s obsession with clocks… a quirky, fun, playful approach. Her concept of time is merrier than mine today. There’s a lesson to be learned….

Timmins new work

Here’s a new piece from Laura Timmins. I’m guessing that this bracelet is constructed on some sort of stretchy cording. It’s an interesting concept that looks like it requires preplanning and weaving skills (so perhaps it’s not for me).

As I was web surfing over the weekend, I realized that I had not asked you to link your sites back to polymerclaydaily. Next time you update your photos (hint, hint) please make a new link to this site at the same time. Thanx

Yummy Colors

Grape, chocolate, kiwi, mandarin orange, avacado, blueberry, raspberry, mango, papaya and mint. Lindly Haunani’s 2006 colors make you hungry for more. In her hands polymer clay looks alive and edible.

If you’re feeling shy and tentative about your colors, if your supply of gray waste clay is larger than it should be, sign up for a color class. Check Lindly’s site, track Maggie Maggio down or sign up at your local art school.

Knowing more about color will save you money. You’ll buy three colors instead of the rainbow you now invest in. Your pile of scrap will shrink. You won’t have to pretend that mud was what you were aiming for. Your confidence will grow.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...


  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


  • Here are 4 ways to get daily posts


  • Download your FREE eBook
    7 Great Ways to Teach Yourself Polymer Clay.
    Contains 62 free resources for learning polymer clay online.

    Click here to download.