Considering new bead shapes

My conditioned polymer clay and tools are packed and I’m thinking about what I want to experiment with on vacation. I’m considering new shapes and these two artists are way ahead of me.

Spain’s “CynsClay” uses open rings of polymer clay to build her Calder-like pendants. The spacer beads add color and a dash of humor.

Austria’s Carina Feichtinger nestles curved leaf shapes within each other to create the appearance of larger overlapping beads.

I’ll add these two to my binder of “possibilities” that you all have provided me with. We’re off to New Mexico.

Lopez del Prado’s polymer clay adventures

Barcelona’s Elvira Lopez Del Prado mixes her media and works with polymer clay in unconstrained ways. Her use of color is refined and her designs are exhuberant. She dabbles with many polymer clay techniques and comes up with some brilliant pieces like the stunning red beads below (transfers? stamps? canes?).

She’s equally adventurous with felt, wire, fabric, paper and resin and her fearless approach is just what I need to start my week in the studio. She shows her work on several sites and you’ll want to visit them all here, here and here.

Wilkes found objects found

Lori Wilkes (Millori) has a knack for integrating found objects with polymer clay. This bracelet includes antique china embedded in polymer. Her transfers are an intriguing mix of old images on backgrounds of bright modern colors and she’s working on an “industrial meets organic” concept.

What amazes me is that I’ve overlook Lori’s work and she lives just a few miles away from me here in Ohio! It was only by thumbing through bead magazines at the library that I ran into her work. It’s great to start the week with a new name and a new website (plus blog, Etsy, Flickr) on our list.

Timmins promotes polymer

Wisconsin’s Laura Timmins put polymer clay on the cover of Key Milwaukee magazine. Laura makes her own cord and carefully crafts all the findings and beads in her asian-looking designs. You’ll love the look at her process. She uses a no-nonsense approach to marketing and selling polymer clay that works.

This magazine article promotes the Hidden River Art Festival at the Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts held September 19-21.

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Thanks for all your good wishes. We’re fine and without power for another few days. I will continue to visit my sister nearby for showers and internet. I’m slowly catching up on my email and research and I appreciate your patience.

Picarello, Fajardo push concepts further


I’ve been trying to push my polymer clay design ideas a bit further so I was intrigued when I saw how Julie Picarello has been taking her earlier metalworking ideas (top left image) and reworking them for polymer (bottom pair). She’s also got a cute pinwheel shape started from some playful experimentation.

Barbara Fajardo has rediscovered swag-shaped beads, a graceful shape that she wants to explore.

This makes me want to take a second look at concepts that I may have abandoned too soon.

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Appealing spring choices

Some days everything appeals to me. I couldn’t decide which of these polymer clay finds to feature today so I’m showing you all of them.

Barcelona’s Tatiana Franchi’s little figure has such a casual lifelike stance that I was totally charmed by it. Check out the Crocs on her tiny feet.

Perhaps it’s because I never learned to crochet that Portugal’s Sandra Rodrigues’ bright beads with crocheted covers draw me in.

And then there’s Scott Mizevitz’ magic bead (refer to basic how-to’s here and here). The colors glow and I wonder if you can make that magic happen consistently or if it’s just, well, magic.

It’s a spacey, spring Thursday. Everything looks lovely. Enjoy. (Comments may not be working right until this weekend. Send yours to [email protected].)

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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