cane

Polymer fish out of water

Terlizzi on PCDaily

Melissa Terlizzi’s Like a Fish Out of Water picked up an award at the Art Works gallery in Richmond, VA even though Melissa says she feels like all her polymer nature scenes look like fish out of water when they’re shown with other traditional art.

Terlizzi on PCDaily

She gravitates to bugs and tide pools, shells and sea life. This cane is the result of her taking a long look at turtles, a hard job for someone who admits she can’t sit still.

Melissa has created a following for her Clay and Cabernet nights at a local gallery on warm summer evenings. You’ll find her on Facebook and Flickr.

Rees self portrait

Rees on PCDaily

Utah’s Adam Thomas Rees thinks big. He usually covers large animal sculptures with polymer patterns but this time his subject was himself.

First he painted a self-portrait. Then he decided to continue his self study by converting the painting to a 12.5″ x 10″ cane.

Rees on PCDaily

He chopped the big cane into 20 small (2.5″) square canes to minimize waste and distortion during reduction. The reduced canes were then reassembled into the finished portrait.

The process is fascinating to see (and his web site is under the weather). I’ve repeated his Facebook photos in a special gallery for you non-FB readers.

It’s not just the size and reduction that make us study Adam’s cane. What look like slap-dash layers of unexpected color build into an exciting self portrait.

That should start your wheels turning on a Monday!

Eastern Tales

Lyamayeva on PCDaily

Hamburg’s Antonina Lyamayeva calls these her Bagels necklaces. This one is called Eastern Tales. The flat disks have big holes and jumble up nicely. She combines solid colors and patterned disks with a few metal circles thrown in for bling.

This design is quite trendy and it’s another good use for bits of your favorite canes. (Antonia sells a tutorial.)

She’s an accomplished caner which you can see in a separate Etsy shop here. She also works with glass and metal. Check her out on Pinterest and Facebook.

More Eastern Tales

I’m flying to Malta at the end of the week (and I’m blaming the mishap with Betsy Baker’s link yesterday on travel jitters). My speech is ready but I’m not packed.

I’ll report from EuroSynergy for a few days and then I’ll close up shop for a month, posting intermittently as I travel in Nepal and Turkey. After years of blogging daily, I’m anxious to see what happens when I unplug.

I sure hope you’ll check in often for my news from the road and be here when I get back. It’s an opportunity for you to shake up your routine too.

Converging polymer

“For this pendant I used a convergence pattern inspired by a quilting template,” says Switzerland’s Sandra Trachsel. The colors buzz against each other as the stripes alternately grow thinner and fatter.

What draws you further in  are the chunky areas of color outside the center square. There’s much to deconstruct and reassemble as you study how the pattern works. Sandra must have been a quilter in another life.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you.

    You can find my new book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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