Crisp and starched from France

MissTyc's dots, stripes and textures

These dots, stripes and colors from France’s MissTyc have a crisp, starched, freshness about them and we’ve never featured her before (her real name’s a mystery).

MissTyc’s newest work seems to be on her Facebook album and you can find her on Flickr too. On her website she offers a sweet little spring dotted flower cane tutorial (based on Desiree McCrorey’s Spotted Langloisi).

MissTyc's bangle

Crisp and starched is not my mode this week. I’m waiting for my children to meet up with us for a family spring break. Shifting into vacation mode has been a slow and pleasurable process. Stay tuned.

Fantasy flowers from Korringa

Kim Korringa's polymer fantasy flowers

If yesterday’s post put you in a flowery mood, you’ll want to follow today’s links to Kim Korringa’s garden. She posts her signature whimsical caned designs on her web site. Kim’s fish cane tutorial is a popular one.

On her Etsy site she lists one-of-a-kind designs like this multi-color fantasy flower necklace backed with stripe-edged black disks. Pure spring.

Judy Belcher sent the link along. The sun is shining and spring is on its way. Have a springy, sunny weekend.

Kimle’s perfect pairings

Kimle's mixed media beads

I stumbled into some new works that continue our mixed media theme.

“I created these beads as an exercise in color and pattern,” says Iowa’s Patricia Kimle. “My goal was to skate along the fine line between ugly color combinations and a sophisticated palette that works.”

She used metal clay and hand drawn molds to create the silver feathers that are riveted to the polymer. The feathers create the focus and push the colors and patterns into the background. The beads are in an exhibit at her local art center. See more on her website and her Etsy page.

Kimle's polymer easter egg Iowa statehouse dome

Patricia will be teaching at the Bead and Button show in June and her second book, Perfectly Paired: Designing Jewelry with Polymer and Metal Clays will be released in April.

Taking a trip down memory lane and longing for spring, Patricia shares a picture of a polymer Easter egg of the Iowa Statehouse dome that she prepared for the White House in 2000. I couldn’t resist including it.

Wild West work

Melanie West promised new work and true to her word, she’s featuring a new line of brooches that expands her sea creature-inspired repertoire. She’s bravely posted her plans for the year.

New beginnings are good for us. Lots of polymer clay artists are rolling out fresh work, reorganizing, posting and updating. There’s a definite out-with-the-old, in-with-the-new vibe in the air.

My young tech-saavy neice is coming over today to discuss my social networking strategy. Losing weight used to be my social networking strategy but I don’t think that’s what she has in mind.

Eakes’ polymer gifts

Julie Eakes offers a nifty poinsettia tutorial on her blog. She collages slices from four or five basic canes onto a graduated background for one variation. Then she shows how the same canes can be used for sculptural or dimensional pieces. What a nice gift to readers.

If you’ve caught the generous spirit of the holidays, you may want to:

Thanks to Susan Lomuto at DailyArtMuse and Lindly Haunani for the links.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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