Back to bowls

Silvana Bates turns salvaged cane bits into charming soap dishes on PolymerClayDaily.com

You may have thought you’d seen enough polymer bowls. Ireland’s Silvana Bates’ soap dishes pulls us out of bowl overload.

For her jewelry designs, Silvana creates batches of canes in her favorite palettes that lean toward faded colors and homey patterns.

By joining the tail ends of canes and shaping random bits into bowls, she accentuates their charm in a way that hints of soft old quilts in cozy cottages. She made these to hold her daughter’s collection of soaps.

Browse through her photos on Facebook and don’t miss the video of her woodsy creations that will be part of November’s Into The Forest exhibit.

Can you salvage bits of your favorite pieces and create a signature bowl?

Succulent polymer

Kim Korringa creates a succulent world on PolymerClayDaily.com

This bowl of succulents from California’s Kim Korringa was a marvel to behold. Everything…the 6″ rock bowl, the succulents, the soil, even the string-of-pearls…was made of polymer.

You can tell from Kim’s attention to detail that she’s quite a gardener.

Kim Korringa creates a succulent world on PolymerClayDaily.com

Meanwhile, Kim was also working on a line of caned Christmas jewelry for the Uno Alla Volta catalog adding minuscule ornaments on yards of caned trees.

Tabletop polymer

Bridget Derc's step-by-step tabletop on PolymerClayDaily.com

Why is it that when you can’t actually get your hands on polymer for one reason or another, watching someone else complete a project is especially engrossing?

Bridget Derc's step-by-step tabletop on PolymerClayDaily.com

We’re all on the sidelines shouting, “You go, girl” to the UK’s Bridget Derc and her complex mandala tabletop.

She took photos of every cane, every measurement, every step of the way and uploaded them to Flickr for you to enjoy vicariously.

Stars and stripes from abroad

Shuli Raanan's star canes turn into patriotic beads on PolymerClayDaily

Each year our red, white and blue canes are provided by another country! Aren’t you proud of that?

Thanks to Israel and Shuli Raanan for these stars and stripes canes. Her Etsy site is full of flags and tidy swirl beads topped with stars in unusual ways.

Shuli Raanan's star canes turn into patriotic beads on PolymerClayDaily.com

If you’ve ever made a bicone bead that swirls as hers do, you’ll appreciate her precision. It still looks like magic when Shuli does it so well. You can find her work on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

Visiting grandchildren will be distracting me for the next few days so PCD posts will be intermittent or missing altogether this week. Have a great holiday!

Staying flexible

Tucson’s Meg Newberg (polymerclayworkshop) loves devising low tech/high results canes. Her followers find Meg’s instructions easy to follow as she builds precise patterns from simple rolls, blends and stacks. Following her steps is simple, very rewarding and great for building your skills.

The inmates in the ORW class are Meg’s biggest fans because no special tools or exotic ingredients are required to produce stunning results.

Her videos have a large and growing following on Facebook. She sells her tutorials and canes on Etsy as well as by subscription.

Here Meg shows a polymer hex-a-flex. Maybe in high school you sent secret notes to friends using a similar paper trick.

If you’re interested in more secret notes, join the StudioMojo group that looks behind the scenes on Saturday mornings. 

Reminders of spring

Schwartzenberg on PolymerClayDaily.com

Lynne Ann Schwarzenberg reminds us how she artfully arranges cane slices into the most interesting earrings.

Schwarzenberg on PolymerClayDaily.com

With her stash of beautiful tiny canes she makes turning them into layered designs look easy. See a few more versions on Facebook and more of her signature work on Pinterest and Instagram.

Reminders of spring and Lynne. She thought we might have forgotten her. Not a chance!

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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