Dashing through the snow

Lehocky/Dwyer on PCDaily

Jayne Dwyer and Ron Lehocky collaborated on these dashing reindeer. Jayne’s a caning whiz and Ron’s a talented scavenger who turns lowly scraps from other artists (Jayne’s cane ends in this example) into high art with a purpose.

So even if you’re dashing today, take a moment to appreciate the little things, small blessings and serendipitous collaborations.

Ron shared an animation on Facebook that says it all, “Have a heart, pass it on.” For Ron, making hearts has become meditative. Watch him do it here.

See more of Jayne’s canes here.

Dizzying patterns in polymer

Newberg on PCDaily

Sometimes we polymer artists just want to sit and admire the work that goes into a series of canes like this lovely black and white grouping from Meg Newberg. And she doesn’t extrude!

Meg has a brain made for caning. She knows how to break the process down into bite-sized pieces that she shares in monthly tutorials. Take a look on Etsy, Facebook and her site.

Breathe in and let your eyes dance around the patterns. Feel better?

Stretching polymer

speisser_vessel_1

Australia’s Sabine Speisser (papagodesign) is pleased with how her online class with Christine Dumont and Donna Greenberg propelled her polymer work forward.

This 7″x 9″ vessel, a Microcosm of Micro-organisms, was created in Voila’s Creative Design Series. Sabine’s dense patterns quiver with energy and life force.

“Guided outside influence and critique opens us up to many more possibilities beyond one’s comfort zone,” says Sabine. Read more of her comments on Facebook and follow her on Flickr.

Ready to stretch your boundaries?

 

Showing off the results

Steele on PCDaily

What do you do with those magnificent pieces of cane? Sometimes it’s a challenge.

Here France’s Laure Steele (LorEtCreations) makes pieces of a master class cane into a stunning pendant by elegantly joining two shield shapes. The accents she uses are subtle and effective.

See more of her sleight of hand on Pinterest and Facebook.

I’m in a cane class with Marie Segal in Kentucky and my eye is searching for ways to show off the best bits. Join the StudioMojo group for a Saturday morning report.

Decoding polymer DNA

Russell on PCDaily

Samples of cane slices are not usually newsworthy but these translucent pieces from Maryland’s Kelly Russell will have you transfixed.

The patterns have a slightly DNA look. Kelly holds a #5 slice out in the sun and the delicate strands light up.

russell_transl_sun

There’s much that we’re just discovering about building layers of pattern with translucent thanks to Kelly and other experimenters.

If you check her out on Facebook, you’ll also see the stunning results from her recent master class with Carol Simmons.

Transforming canes

Newberg on PCDaily

Meg Newbergs’ transforming cane shifts colors like a treasured and worn carpet. What’s one cane looks like many.

It’s difficult to comprehend how the simple canes she constructs can reduce to be so complex. She’s got a great grasp of geometry and she sends out pages of pictures and explanations of a new idea each month.

If you enjoy caning, her monthly subscription is a good deal. This transforming cane is August’s lesson.

Newberg on PCDaily

Meg allows me to teach some of her designs to inmates who are delighted each time they follow her clear instructions. Not many tools are required and even the newest caners can experience success. Here she is on her site and Etsy.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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