A tangle of polymer

AnarinaAnar on PolymerClayDaily.com

A pretty tangle of polymer flowers from Greece’s AnarinaAnar rounds out PCDaily’s week.

Her pieces have a distinctive look with ceramic-like speckled finishes and dark edges that provide contrast. These flowers bobble on thin wires.

There’s a spontaneous quality about her work that starts the weekend on the right foot. Check Flickr, Facebook and Etsy if you need to soak up more of her cheeriness.

Clay on clay

Loveless on PCDaily

MaryAnne Loveless shares her own brand of mixed media. She throws ceramic pots, leaving spaces for polymer. Clay on clay.

A polymer stopper top or a band of color are added after the piece has been kiln fired. Of course the ceramic piece can tolerate another baking.

Loveless on PCDaily

She added a wire and polymer handle to the ceramic teapot below. See how she mixes media on tins, wood bases, ceramics by checking her out on Flickr and Pinterest. What can you pair with polymer?

Nuts! I published early. My site’s clock seems to have a bug in it. I’ll try to fix it and bring you your regularly scheduled programming as soon as I can figure it out.

Beach finds

It feels as if you could brush warm ancient sand off these polymer treasures from Elena Sevva (here’s the correct link). Elena is from Ukraine and lives in Israel.

She wraps delicate wire around some of the amber-like beads and strings them on a leather cord to complete the effect. Stamped designs and scratches are accented with faux metallic and ceramic finishes. Look at them more closely on her Flickr pages.

Summer travels

I’m fully in vacation mode and PCD posts may reflect that as they appear little later and on a more leisurely schedule. Let’s all have some summer fun.

Davis’ faux ceramic amulets

I’ve admired Lynn Davis’ work but never featured her because I wasn’t sure what materials she was using. She mixes glass, stones, found items, metal, ceramic, polymer clay and more in her romantic pieces. Her faux is so pro that I was never sure what was polymer.

She says of her faux-tique amulets, “Some resemble white bisque fired clay, with wear and showing a lot of rustic aging. And others look like marble or limestone chipped off an old building, or parts from ancient grecian architecture.”

Recently Lynn’s been experimenting with faux lithophanes (she’s looking for an easier name) and writing about it on her site. You can add your two cents there.

Note: There’s a nice faux ceramics tutorial on Michael Johansson’s PolymerClayWeb site.

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My studio renovation should be finished soon. It’s been a great week. Thanks for all your comments and suggestions. Have an olympic weekend.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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