No-fail knitting

Leila Bidler gives imitative knitting a new twist on

Even if you never learned to knit, Italy’s Leila Bidler demonstrates how you can simulate the look. She extrudes strings of polymer in shades of blue, twists them and lines them up…without dropping a stitch!

A second layer of stitching every inch or so gives the swatch the look of a fancier pattern and more complex knitting.

On Leila’s Instagram page she turns these faux knits into cozy cuffs and finishes them with a faux wood button for a wintry accessory.

A snowy day is a perfect time to check out this season’s crop of faux knit ideas. Every year there’s some new twist. PCD’s all-time favorites are still Juliya Laukhina’s from 2010.

If you’re looking for more fun behind-the-scenes tidbits, come on over to StudioMojo where we indulge in deep polymer chats every Saturday morning. 

Properly cuffed

Baker's cuffs on

Don’t you love the slightly concave curve of these cuffs from Boston’s Betsy Baker? Her silvery polymer veneers are enhanced by the brass forms.

This pile of prototypes is part of a new wholesale line Betsy is building. She offers this early peek on Instagram.

Go to her site to see how she elegantly transforms vintage components and gives them a fresh flair by combining them with polymer.

Tumbling blocks of polymer


Three shades of each color make up this faux dimensional cuff from Petra Nemravova of the Czech Republic. Such happy colors! Petra shows her step-by-step color-mixing and assembly process free on her website.

Of course you’ll want to spend some time in her tutorials and tools departments! There are a couple tutorials in her Etsy shop too.

Ancient updated

Stettler on PCdaily

Switzerland’s Anouk Stettler (habetrotdesign)  updates tribal designs and mixes them with modern materials and sensibilities.

Stettler on PCDaily

This brass and polymer cuff, she says, is one she wears often. Her designs have a freshness about them and she pairs textures and shapes that you may not expect.

You can do a little detective work on Instagram, Flickr and Facebook.

Nailed it

Primatoide on PCDaily

The bangle at the right could have been clipped out of a Paul Klee painting. France’s Agnes (Primatoide) calls it her Ancient Assyrian Ceramic Cuff which is made of polymer, inks and paint.

But I bet Paul Klee didn’t make nail art to match his paintings!

Primatoide on PCDaily

Agnes takes her nail art seriously and moves it to a whole new level. She was inspired by Claire Wallis’ caned nails. Now Agnes often creates companion polymer nail art for her jewelry.

Even if nail art doesn’t suit your fashion sense, you may find her methods and concepts fascinating. See more of her rough, ancient polymer on Flickr.

Feel good Friday

Crouse on PCDaily

Tina Crouse’s is a feel-good Friday story. She’s launched a Facebook page to spread the word about the Kindware Premier program. Tina is the Ohio project’s manager and she’s introducing their new collection of Medallion Cuffs, wide leather bands with a polymer oval stamped with a choice of an inspirational word.

Tina took part in the Kindway program when she was incarcerated. The polymer jewelry that inmates make as they’re building their skills is sold by volunteers at art fairs and other events.

Once they transition back into their community, they may opt to continue selling their polymer art through Kindware Premier. Tina explains it more clearly.


“I became involved in this organization while I was incarcerated and not only did it change my life, but it gave me a future. All these handcrafted gifts are made possible because there are people investing in lives impacted by incarceration. While I was incarcerated I was able to develop a skill set working with polymer clay that I never knew I had. It became an outlet for me. Each time I worked with the clay I would turn all the negative that happened in my life into positive. All the bad things that were said to me into kind words – I am a good mother, I am smart, I am beautiful, I am worth it and I CAN CHANGE! All those stones thrown at me at one time are now re-purposed and transformed into beautiful gems.” she says eloquently.

But life’s not always easy (here’s more of her story) and Tina works as a waitress and takes care of her children as well. She was able to attend the Buckeye Bash conference last month (that’s Tina with me and Ron Lehocky in Dayton). The Kindway women sent along inchies they’d made. Tina serves as a terrific role model for other women who will be released in the near future.

Your support, likes, and good wishes energize these women and the Kindway/Kindware project. Have a feel good weekend. Contact Tina here to purchase her cuffs which cost $25 plus $3 shipping.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.

  • Here are 4 ways to get daily posts

  • Download your FREE eBook
    7 Great Ways to Teach Yourself Polymer Clay.
    Contains 62 free resources for learning polymer clay online.

    Click here to download.