Heishi how-to

Marina Rios gives you a heishi how-to on PolymerClayDaily

Who doesn’t like to start the week with a free tutorial? You showed such interest in the mid-July PCD post that featured chunky heishi beads by Marina Rios that she responded with a 1-minute video on Instagram.

Watch carefully! She bakes the round tubes before she cuts the facets. She paints them and then splatters the surfaces with alcohol inks. A second batch she covers with several colors of stained glass paints.

She cuts the tubes into disks when they’re baked and off the rods. Thanks for the tricks, Marina!

If cutting cooled clay into disks becomes difficult, you can pop them back into the oven to warm again. They cut like butter when warm.

Disks dotted with energy

Haskova on PCDaily

These dotted circle beads by the Czech Republic’s Eva Haskova may stump you. Zoom in and out and still you’d have to guess. Caned? Carved? Extruded?

The disks are part of a new “energy topography” class but the translation doesn’t explain much.

All that aside, Eva’s mind works in interesting ways and this new work is an extension of some of her distinctive earlier works that you can study on Flickr and Facebook. Can you follow the dots and unravel the mystery?

Polymer chips

Belkomor on PCDaily

Russia’s Maria Belkomor is drawn to disks too. Hers are usually thin and flat (unlike yesterday’s Bagels) and her most recent versions have chipped edges that increase their tactile quality. It would be hard not to play with these when you wore them.

It takes quite a supply of disks to make this East Lemonade necklace (that’s what the translation called it) which ends with carved beads and a matching button closure.

Belkomor on PCDaily

The best place to see Maria’s stackable creations is on Pinterest. She has more on Flickr and her blog, including a lovely way of knitting with extruded strings. Thanks to Eva Menager for the link.

Lots to nosh on

Thank you for all the notes wishing me Bon Voyage. I’ve left a few goodies in the blog freezer that will automatically emerge now and then. You won’t starve and there are plenty of morsels in the archives if you get peckish. (Scroll to the bottom of the right column.)

Stacking and unpacking

ic_disc_necklace

I’m sending you off to France to discover that By IC is Isa Castellano. I’m liking the way she stacks graduated polymer clay disks into a focal bead. Isa combines beads and colors and media with energy and abandon.

The translation is garbled but the pictures tell a great story.

I’m unloading my suitcase, bringing my head back into the right timezone and readjusting to what passes for normal life. Enjoy IC’s site and her DaWanda gallery while I catch up.

Prophater’s polymer world

Laurie Prophater is the owner of a large trade showroom for interior designers here in Ohio. At work she’s surrounded by a wealth of design and color from around the world.

Laurie’s begun to share how that environment informs her polymer clay work in her blog, Ornamental Elements.

She’s also bravely sharing some of her experiments and works in progress (like the swirls and simulated glass tiles here) on her Flickr site. She’s on the right track and it’s going to be fun to see what develops.

You can see her earlier polymer clay transfers here.

Frame’s polymer adaptation

Vacation mate Jan Frame strung and restrung the polymer clay disks she had created in a range of colors. She was dissatisfied with the weight of the finished necklaces and dismayed by her stash of beads that simply wouldn’t do what she wanted.

She restrung them again. This time they were in an 8′ strand that she hung from a tree in the New Mexico sun where they looked bright and sculptural. We’re encouraging her to try using the sculpture as a rain chain.

We’ve experimented, adapted and had fun with polymer this week. Adios, New Mexico.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

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