Polymer rocks!

The response to our polymer clay and wood works at the local artfair (a few more pix here) was rewarding beyond our expectations. An article in the local news prompted old friends and neighbors to come see what we were up to.

The debut of my polymer clay rock line (called the Wilma Flintstone collection by my husband) was so enthusiastic that even the little rock cairns I created to enhance the displays ended up being hot items.

They’re not just my rocks, of course. I blame Kim Cavender for first showing me some rock tricks, and Tracy Holmes for her west coast versions. Betsy Baker makes great pebble earrings and Tory Hughes is widely recognized as the creator of the finest faux. Thanks to all of them and many others for their inspiration.

Craynor’s faux African beads

Utah’s Cody Craynor sent me a link to his meticulously constructed polymer clay faux African chevron beads. Cody is refreshingly clear that his interest is only in the beads, not in making jewelry. He claims that his passion for beads began when he was transfixed by the color and clatter of a bead curtain in his parents’ 1970s bathroom. Take a look at his new site and work.

The mention of African beads derailed my daily research as I remembered earlier faux ancients. Here’s where the wayback machine took me:

• Jamey Allen’s folded beads (as seen on the Polymer Art Archive)
Desiree McCrory‘s faux chevrons
Klew‘s folded beads

Play-Doh video

I didn’t quite get the concept of last week’s Play-Doh/shaped cane breakthrough. I missed the part about Play-Doh only being used for a barrier layer with filler polymer layered on top. This video from ArtbyYonat answered all my questions. All reports are that the technique works.

Phillips’ faux flora and fauna

Lori “Tab” Phillips majored in ceramics and she brings a potter’s sensibility to her polymer clay faux ceramic beads and pods. Her palette is bright…perfect for spring…as in this chic and charming magic bean necklace.

If you take a look at her photo site, you’ll see how her eye gravitates to the same palette in nature.

Lori uses a strip of unbaked polymer as a bead board when she’s assembling a necklace. Pretty clever, eh?

This Kentucky artist is new to PCDaily (thanks to Darleen Bellan). You’ll want to keep tabs on her blog, her Flickr and her Etsy sites.

Davis’ faux fossils

Lynn Davis makes polymer clay faux ceramic beads like no one else. In her recent post she lets us peer over her shoulder as she finishes a batch.

Repeated painting and buffings give her beads a patina and hints of past lives. These faux fossils are particularly alluring and the use of links instead of holes in the beads makes them even more unusual. Her Etsy shop shows a great selection.

If, like me, you want to know how to get started, take a look at this polymerclayweb tutorial. Here’s an earlier post about Lynn.

Polymer eggs, snakes and more

Carol Simmons has been hatching plans to extrude metallic polymer clays in new ways. (Here’s the link to the large picture of the eggs. The regular link is acting contrary.)

These clay-covered eggs were a recent product of her experiments and she’ll be revealing her discoveries in a class at her studio in Ft. Collins, Colorado this Saturday. Here are earlier posts about Carol’s kaleidoscope-cane works and award-winning pendants.

Egging you on…

May 1 is the deadline for entries in Interweave’s Bead Star Challenge. The prizes are pretty nice (just ask Valerie Aharoni, last year’s winner). I notice that Valerie has tested Creative Imaginations’ Super Seal Spray on polymer with good results.

And at the Chelsea Flower Show in London, they’re looking for clay artists who can help them create a 30 square foot garden. Thanks to Justine for the link.

Check out this faux snakeskin! This Python version from Christina (ArtByLilin) won third place in this month’s Etsy faux challenge. Thanks Ronna.

Lotta links today! You sent in a shower of April tips. Does that mean May will bring flowers?

Project polymer runway

While I’m not much of a fashionista, I couldn’t help looking at the chunky crazy jewelry in the Fall 2009 Marni collection on Fashionologie. Imagine whipping it up in polymer clay.

Take a look at Marni’s jewels and then picture this…Marie Segal’s faux drusy (here too), Barb Fajardo’s flowers, with a few faux ancients from Velmachos and Yamamura. Help me out here. Who else can we recruit for our polymer project runway?

Thanks to Marie Segal for the new link to Yamamura. Here are earlier posts about Yamamura’s work and her Etsy site. (Kotomi offers her clever downloadable pattern for a DIY necklace display stand here.)

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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