Phillips’ faux flora and fauna

Lori “Tab” Phillips majored in ceramics and she brings a potter’s sensibility to her polymer clay faux ceramic beads and pods. Her palette is bright…perfect for spring…as in this chic and charming magic bean necklace.

If you take a look at her photo site, you’ll see how her eye gravitates to the same palette in nature.

Lori uses a strip of unbaked polymer as a bead board when she’s assembling a necklace. Pretty clever, eh?

This Kentucky artist is new to PCDaily (thanks to Darleen Bellan). You’ll want to keep tabs on her blog, her Flickr and her Etsy sites.

Davis’ faux fossils

Lynn Davis makes polymer clay faux ceramic beads like no one else. In her recent post she lets us peer over her shoulder as she finishes a batch.

Repeated painting and buffings give her beads a patina and hints of past lives. These faux fossils are particularly alluring and the use of links instead of holes in the beads makes them even more unusual. Her Etsy shop shows a great selection.

If, like me, you want to know how to get started, take a look at this polymerclayweb tutorial. Here’s an earlier post about Lynn.

Polymer eggs, snakes and more

Carol Simmons has been hatching plans to extrude metallic polymer clays in new ways. (Here’s the link to the large picture of the eggs. The regular link is acting contrary.)

These clay-covered eggs were a recent product of her experiments and she’ll be revealing her discoveries in a class at her studio in Ft. Collins, Colorado this Saturday. Here are earlier posts about Carol’s kaleidoscope-cane works and award-winning pendants.

Egging you on…

May 1 is the deadline for entries in Interweave’s Bead Star Challenge. The prizes are pretty nice (just ask Valerie Aharoni, last year’s winner). I notice that Valerie has tested Creative Imaginations’ Super Seal Spray on polymer with good results.

And at the Chelsea Flower Show in London, they’re looking for clay artists who can help them create a 30 square foot garden. Thanks to Justine for the link.

Check out this faux snakeskin! This Python version from Christina (ArtByLilin) won third place in this month’s Etsy faux challenge. Thanks Ronna.

Lotta links today! You sent in a shower of April tips. Does that mean May will bring flowers?

Project polymer runway

While I’m not much of a fashionista, I couldn’t help looking at the chunky crazy jewelry in the Fall 2009 Marni collection on Fashionologie. Imagine whipping it up in polymer clay.

Take a look at Marni’s jewels and then picture this…Marie Segal’s faux drusy (here too), Barb Fajardo’s flowers, with a few faux ancients from Velmachos and Yamamura. Help me out here. Who else can we recruit for our polymer project runway?

Thanks to Marie Segal for the new link to Yamamura. Here are earlier posts about Yamamura’s work and her Etsy site. (Kotomi offers her clever downloadable pattern for a DIY necklace display stand here.)

Jackson’s polymer ancients

At the local guild meeting Debbie Jackson brought this great polymer clay necklace she’d made. The mottled beads are done with a sprayed alcohol ink technique that she teaches (she calls them quail eggs). The other faux turquoise and scarab beads are so convincingly done that the entire effect is ancient and artful.

She has a knack for the imitative and the cultural artifact. Her book, Polymer Clay Jewelry, contains many of her best recipes.

I wish I’d taken a picture of Debbie who is growing a new crop of silky hair that looks quite trendy. Thanks to Jeanette Kandray who loaned me her camera at the meeting.

Note: I’m on the road (San Diego). Saw some lovely rocks on our long beach walk today. Great ideas for my polymer versions.

Real-looking polymer clay objects

This polymer clay lariat by Adams Schoolhouse reminds us that it’s time to break out the mittens. The variegated yarns look labor-intensive, very wooly, very real.

Speaking of looking real, check out the Australian “Making Sense” art exhibit that featured the work of artists who replicate benign objects and spaces.

Polymer artist Emma White explains that, “Sometimes the joke’s on me because people can’t tell the object is handmade (like the polymer clay post-it here), so they kind of don’t even see it.” Read more about Emma here.

Thanks to Susan Lomuto for the exhibit link and for making us start the week looking very carefully.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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