Da to metallics

Natalya Pakhomova coaxes the luster from Cernit Metallics on PolymerClayDaily.com

The translation from the Instagram of Moscow’s Natalya Pakhomova makes little sense but her beads may speak your language.

We know they’re made from Cernit metallics using what they’re calling a snakeskin texture plate to achieve this loose mokume gane pattern.

With just the right coaxing, Cernit metallics can create a soft luster that says yes (that’s “da” in Russian). Here they are as earrings.

Blossoming beads

Juliya Laukhina's beads blossom with color on PolymerClayDaily

Moscow’s Juliya Laukhina covers her dark round beads with dense delicate dots of pastel colors. Is she using mokume gane off-cuts? Or has she taken another path?

It doesn’t matter, of course. She mostly uses round beads of this size as her canvas and every time I check, she’s trying another method to decorate them.

Juliya must have a science background since she’s methodical in her experimenting, only changing one variable at a time. These tight dots look like spring blossoms. She’s on Instagram and Etsy.

Mokume gane escape

Mesmerizing pinks and very 2019 colors (with the sound of cheering college football crowds in my background) make me daydream about Australian classes.

If you need to escape sports games I recommend spending some time on Dani Rapinett’s The Whimsical Bead’ site. The site flows seamlessly among various media. They offer an array of workshops and it’s fun to wander around. Try Instagram if you want a quick overview.

Is this an updated variation on my Leslie Blackford’s Garlic Gane video? No matter, it’s soothing and just what I need.

Goodbye to 2018

Tory Hughes brooch entitled The Path from Nothing to Something hints at the themes of her works on PolymerClayDaily.com

In 2018 we said goodbye to Tory Hughes, one of the polymer community’s true pioneers. This piece entitled The Path from Nothing to Something hints at the ethereal, celestial themes that appeared in Tory’s works.

To close out the year, enjoy one more walk through her Santa Fe studio and savor the richness of her work. We will miss her.

Polymer roots

Shelley Atwood puts her own spin on scrap mokume gane earrings on PolymerClayDaily.com

Think of polymer techniques as having a lineage when you look at these earrings from Texas’ Shelley Atwood.

Kathy Amt taught Dayle Doroshow who shared it with me who showed a whole bunch of folks this scrap technique on video. Who knows where it came from even earlier or where it will go next?

It’s circled back around to Shelley who’s put her own spin on it on Instagram. Shelley layered thin bits of scrap and then carved her design, which revealed colors underneath.

It’s invigorating when we see new life in our roots.

Keep going

Meisha Barbee's pushes forward to a new retro brooch on PolymerClayDaily.com

California’s Meisha Barbee began this brooch with a slice of stripes in her wonderful colors. I might have stopped there but she wanted to push on.

She was fond of her silicone trivet with a bubble pattern (strange in-process shot) so she made a mold of it and used that mold to create a mokume gane pattern on top of the stripes which looked weird to my eye.

Meisha Barbee's pushes forward to a new retro brooch on PolymerClayDaily.com

Meisha kept going and added random balls with her Etch ‘n Pearl tools. Better, but I wasn’t loving it.

Stretch, make a border, bake over a lightbulb and wow! A retro pin is born…along with a lesson about following your vision.

So I’m back to daily posting, refreshed and wiser and following my vision thanks to a month of being with friends who know the importance of following theirs.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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