Polymer reruns

Steven on PCDaily

Vintage celluloid pieces are the starting point for California’s Laurel Steven’s New Old series of pendants and brooches. “In this series I’m combining molded pieces of vintage bits with more modern textures,” she explains.

Steven on PCDaily

She revives and refashions her extensive collection of celluloid by molding polymer versions of the originals and updating them with today’s colors then pairing them with trendy textured backgrounds.

Laurel plays with other techniques that you can see on Facebook, on Flickr, on Pinterest and in her Etsy shop. You can sense that she’s drawn to the old souls of the celluloid florals and enjoys giving these early plastics a second chance in polymer.

Shabby polymer

Niese on PCDaily

If you’re a fan of distressed and worn pieces that look like they spent a previous life in a cottage, you’ll like Sandra DeYoung Niese’s polymer pendants and beads.

Niese on PCDaily

Sandra says the molded beads remind her of her grandmother.

She updates her romantic shabby look with bright contemporary colors. The highlights have been sanded off to expose dark colored polymer below. See more of her rustic line on Flickr, her Etsy site and on Facebook.

Understated polymer

These holiday polymer earrings from Michigan’s Sandra DeYoung-Niese may calm you in a hectic week.

Sandra created her own mold from a real evergreen branch. It’s a subtle holiday image with just a touch of red and a dusting of snow.

Wander slowly through her understated Etsy items and her Flickr site where the soothing vibe continues. Breathe!

Polymer shoe-in

Jacqueline Cherie has retrieved her studio from storage and unpacked all the molds she researched and collected.

You’ve probably run across images in books like these that feature her polymer pieces which were meticulously rendered and based on antiquities, pre-Columbian images and Asian icons.

This polymer encrusted shoe, created for a contest several years ago, still stuns. Here’s a box and a small container from her collection.

Welcome Jacqueline back after her three-year breather and expect to see photos of her new works posted soon.

Ugly molds for beautiful pendants

Pennsylvania outdoor girl Lynn Lunger (UnaOdd) offers the processes she’s developed for making the deep molds that form her signature Rustic Nature Polymer Pendants.

Her free tutorial shows you the tools you’ll need to make what she calls her ugly molds. It details every step with photographs.

Spring blossoms and budding plants take on new life. See where she finds inspiration and examine more of her finished work on her Flickr page.

You may prefer to bypass mold-making and shop for one of the pendants on her Etsy site. Either way we owe Lynn a big thank you for her generosity in sharing her tips and tricks with us. Nice to start the week with a cool freebie.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

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