mosaic

Tight formations

Thorp on PCDaily

Jael Thorp’s small polymer compositions combine caning and mosaic and texturing in intense formations. Every space is beautifully covered.

There’s a tiny bit of collaboration cane from Ivy Niles (IKandiClay) in these busy scenes. My favorite is the stones and stream-themed shape.

Thorp on PCDaily

Look for more of Jael on her blog, Flickr and Facebook.

I’m off to the Buckeye Bash that’s held at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (speaking of tight formations).  What treasures will turn up? Check tomorrow!

Seeing polymer birds

Cynthia Toops combines large lentil beads covered in millefiori cane slices with small insets of micromosaic bird motifs for this new necklace called Seeing Birds.

The birds are all native to Washington state and the piece is featured in the Of a Feather show at the White River Valley Museum located between Tacoma and Seattle. Read more about the exhibition here.

I wish we had a higher resolution photo so you could dive in for a closer look at her magical images made from super fine threads of polymer.

Toops on PCDaily

For a better example, zoom in on this brooch that Cynthia made for last fall’s Tilling Time/Telling Time show at Facere Gallery. Keep in mind that the brooch is only 1 1/2 inches square! Silver bezel is by Chuck Domitrovich.

Doodled polymer ornaments

Thorp on PCDaily

Filigree meets mosaic meets polymer in these ornaments from Jael Thorp. The dark reds and bright accents add richness, hinting at traditional patterns and including canework then veering off into more contemporary doodles in clay. Their meandering intensity winds around to weave a complex story.

Thorp on PCDaily

This style started when Jael was doodling with clay as she made a batch of inchies. Read more about how she got carried away in this post and on her blog, on Flickr and Facebook.

Banner polymer

Mika on PCDaily

Laurie Mika provides us with a heraldic banner to start our festive Thanksgiving week. Historically, people displayed their coat of arms and other designs to identify and celebrate the family. This banner is a promo for her classes at the Tucson Art Retreat In the Desert (scroll down to her February 5 class).

Usually Laurie uses her techniques on polymer for shrines or jewelry. In this class she’ll show how the same stamp, paint, collage, embed, layer, transfer methods combine into a mixed-media mosaic that can be used to make banners and other artworks. The banner becomes the vehicle for a modern family narrative.

Laurie is just back from her Day of the Dead workshop in Mexico that you can read about on her blog. You’ll find more of her story on Pinterest and Facebook.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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