Personal polymer sculptures

Bishoff on PCDaily

This cheery eye candy comes from Maine’s Bonnie Bishoff. She and her husband, J.M. Syron create both large and small sculptures – furniture and jewelry from polymer and wood.

Bonnie’s jewelry statement sums it up nicely, “We endeavor to create daily messages of joy, balance, challenge and intrigue; small personal sculptures that enliven the wearer and communicate in intimate detail.  We transform specific materials to create tactile, curious and wearable forms, and rich surfaces of continuing interest.”

This piece measures up to their intent, right? They’re also on Facebook. Don’t miss Bonnie’s shawl pin site.

Buoyed by success

Williamson on PCDaily

Genevieve Williamson’s 16″ Buoyline necklace is part of retailer Anthropologie’s new arrivals in their spring online exclusives.

You can witness Genevieve building her inventory on Instagram and her blog. Her husband and mother packaged and bar-coded to meet the deadline. Stay tuned as Genevieve reveals what she learned about wholesaling, about business and about herself from this big venture.

In case you need some fashion advice, Anthropologie’s designers say,” We’d pair this neutral strand with skinnies and a boyfriend buttondown now, and with a strapless sundress when the weather warms.”

You can also shop for Genevieve’s works on Etsy. I smile when I remember that she’s one of the featured artists in my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives.

Spring takes wing

Bardol on PCDaily

Last fall PCDaily looked at Arden Bardol’s triangular shaped winged beads sold online through Artful Home.

Her spring circular version of the design is even more intriguing. Colors and patterns are added on both sides of flat circles. Two circles containing four patterns are curved and joined to small beads at their centers.

Bardol on PCDaily

Gathered into a necklace, the beads turn and the patterns play against each other.

Another new design, Balancing Act, joins simple shapes in yet another way. Take a closer look at all of Arden’s award-winning designs on Facebook, Tallulah Belle’s online, nd her website.

Two heads swivel

Muir on PCDaily

When Germany’s Bettina Welker and Scotland’s Melanie Muir realized that they’d hit upon the same solution to a polymer connection problem, they got in touch with each other and had a good laugh.

No one would confuse Bettina’s latest Swiveling Neckpiece with this new Standing Stones piece by Melanie but if you deconstructed them, you’d see that the engineering is remarkably similar. They independently worked the connection conundrum out in the same way at the same time.

Swivels and rivets have been around for a long time, of course. This particular solution was a technique whose time had come.

Two takeaways here: you’re part of a community that can solve differences in a frank and cordial way, and sometimes a solution arises in several places at the same time. No harm, no foul.

We can also agree that flawless execution makes everyone take notice. We’ve been searching for ways to hide the distraction of hardware and both these artworks feature polymer beautifully all by itself.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...


  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


  • Here are 4 ways to get daily posts


  • Download your FREE eBook
    7 Great Ways to Teach Yourself Polymer Clay.
    Contains 62 free resources for learning polymer clay online.

    Click here to download.