necklace

Polymer in waves

Blackburn on PCDaily
Blackburn on PCDaily

Carol Blackburn came to polymer through knitting and you can see how she has thought through her work. Her brain stacks and repeats and combines patterns and shapes that appear both engineered and organic.

For several years her strips of color have marched next to each other in increasingly interesting formations, most recently in this Striped Shell Necklace.

In her new Waves series the components now dance and flow more smoothly.

You can witness how she has evolved and moved through the process by looking at her site, at Pinterest, at Flickr and Facebook.

Polymer cut ups

Nowak on PCDaily

Beauty will save the world. – Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Austria’s Izabela Nowak posted this quote on her site and she takes it seriously. She mixes polymer with juice boxes and milk cartons as she navigates her way to beauty in recycling. Upcyling humble materials is part of her most recent Cut Up pieces.

Nowak on PCDaily

A stroll through her Flickr site shows how she’s moved from spiraled up strips of polymer (her Gilese pieces) to intricate folded shapes (Into the Fold) and then to Cut up assemblages.

She has found that most manipulations that can be done with paper can also be done with polymer and she has developed classes and workshops for teaching her methods. Ultimately she combines the two media. Her latest creations appear on her Facebook page.

Nowak on PCDaily

Her colors are bright and her love of geometry comes through strongly as she bends, cuts and folds basic shapes into beauty.

Polymer hunters

Forlano on PCDaily

David Forlano models his newest tube necklace. This version is spiked and curved with striped surfaces. Gouges carved out of the tubes reveal the inner contrasting colors of the tusk-like shapes.

Four layers of polymer claws make the piece bushy and lush and suitable for an African hunter…or a New Mexican artist in this case.

FordForlano on PCDaily

The new design will appear in Ford & Forlano’s upcoming shows.

Watch how they work by viewing their YouTube videos. Catch up with them on their site and on Facebook.

Re-visioning polymer

Toops on PCDaily

Peek at the polymer exhibit that began this week at Carthage College in Kenosha, WI. The opening reception for Re-Visioning: New Works in Polymer at the H.F. Johnson Gallery of Art will be held next Thursday, September 18.

Gallery staff have posted snapshots of the works on Facebook as they arrived to get us excited.

Laura Tabakman’s On the Trail is a delicate installation of a field of blossoms that emerge from the floor and climb one wall.

You can see her sitting on the gallery floor arranging every petal in what turned out to be a 15-hour operation. She says of the show, “OMG, don’t miss it!”

Here you see Cynthia Toops’ So Much Yarn, So Little Time which includes tiny knitting needles that pierce one of the balls of imitative yarn wound in Cynthia’s fastidious micro style. At one time or another all knitters and artists have shared the sentiment of the piece.

Re-Visioning on PCDaily

The event is being held in conjunction with an October polymer symposium, labs, and (in)Organic exhibit at the nearby Racine Art Museum.

The first college level polymer studio class was launched last year at Carthage College. Professor Diane Levesque taught the class and curates this exhibit.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you.

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