Leaves of the world

Leonini on PCDaily

Each side of Cecelia Leonini’s (ImpastArte) leaf-like beads provides a separate canvas. She uses very different geometric patterns on each surface to create her Leaves of the World necklace.

You may like her in-process photos that show how she shaped each of the 3-sided beads on a single gently curved wire. Here she is on Etsy and Facebook.

This more complex and updated worldview of fall leaves is right on target today. Have a great fall weekend.

Twisted polymer

Locatelli on PCDaily

In the original picture these knots and curls from Lindsay Locatelli (WazoDesigns) are photographed laid on top of an Art Jewelry Forum article on contemporary jewelry. Our medium’s sculptural flexibility and color possibilities place polymer squarely in the mix for the future.

Uninhibited gestures like these move us in new directions. They’re also reminiscent of macaroni necklaces that every kid makes.

Lindsay’s Instagram post got me thinking. You too?

See more of her recent mixed media pieces on Facebook.

Splat and swash



Kato on PCDaily

With her latest series of splats and swashes, Donna Kato indulges her love of colored pencils. She always liked the look and feel of pencils but didn’t feel she had the talent to become an illustrator. She always felt at home with polymer.

The Ribbon brooch is the newest iteration that combines the two processes. The Splat necklace continues a sunny spring version.

More and more polymer artists are coloring on both baked and unbaked polymer,

Kato on PCDaily

creating gradations, textures and colors. A black edge enhances the contrast.

Donna has uploaded photos of her growing collection of bright hand-drawn designs on Facebook. Combining pencils, polymer and most recently, animal drawings hits a sweet spot for Donna. “This series really makes me happy, happy.” she says.

Would pencils brighten your day?

Stories on a string

Maggio on PCdaily

There’s no time to browse for a post so I grabbed this favorite from the suitcase I was packing. Maggie Maggio’s circle necklace from several years ago is my must-have for the trip to France.

The thick blue/grays/green disks and slivers, all in her signature watercolor washes, are easy to wear. I love its sleek graphic quality. Each side is a different color and the effect is very architectural. Maggie was trained as an architect and it shows. She’s about to launch a whole new way of exploring color that you can sample on her site.

Maggie lives in Portland, Oregon but her parents live only a few miles from me so she comes to my town often and we’ve become close as we crossed paths over the years. She’s my roommate in Bordeaux.

Pondering my polymer jewels slowed my packing significantly as I picked favorites from the collection I’ve amassed. After a few years meeting online and traveling you’ll be surprised at the wonderful stories, characters and memories you’ll collect. That’s a big part of what polymer art is about.

Polymer infinity

Otrzan on PCDaily

We end the week with one more polymer experimenter. The ideas floating around at the French Lick Atelier must have shifted my brain into gear. I came home hungry to push polymer farther.

Nikolina Otrzan’s new Infinity necklace  jumped out at me. Nik has been turning geometry on its head with her recent exploration of forms. Here she alternates closed and open rectangular links to create a sleek, chic necklace.

I’m sure you’re asking, “Are the links cut out or extruded? What kind of clay and construction tricks could she be using to give this design flexibility and strength?” I have no answers. All I know is that others’ innovations get our creative juices flowing. Thanks, Nik.

Here she is on Pinterest and CraftArtEdu.

Not knitted polymer

Roewekamp on PCDaily

This necklace in nubby neutrals from Portugal’s Susanne Roewekamp (Artesannus) fools the eye. It’s not the crocheted or knitted choker that you may have assumed (it fooled me). It’s textured polymer, extruded I think but now I question my judgment.

See more of Susanne’s eye candy for yourself on Facebook and Pinterest.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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