Glittering polymer

Alisa Levy's party necklace sparkles at Synergy4

Alisa Levy’s jaunty necklace caught my eye at Synergy. The jumble of circles and stripes looked a little Hundertwasser-ish as it sparkled brightly at the opening Synergy4 reception. I snapped a picture.

I’ve learned that the patterns are from a design transferred onto glitter clay. Alisa then colored it cleverly and the effect was perfect fun for the party.

The simplest shapes and techniques dazzle the eye and help make a party festive. I’ll tantalize you with a few more goodies from Synergy as the week progresses. I have to corner Alisa to learn more about her other business called Embrace Your Space.

Polymer colors speak

Demol on PolymerClayDaily.com

Belgium’s Tine Demol shows us how sophisticated long extruded tubes of polymer can become. She suspends the cluster on macrame spirals.

Demol on PolymerClayDaily.com

In the second piece Tine gathers seven strands of small round polymer beads in various hues of greens and blues into a rich twist accented with dashes of yellow. Here she is wearing a similar necklace at FIMO50.

When your colors make a statement, simple techniques are all that’s required. Do your colors speak for themselves? Here’s Tine on Facebook and Flickr.

Light and deceptively strong polymer collaboration

Bishoff/Syron on PolymerClayDaily.com

Don’t take my word for it, go see for yourself how complex and exciting this 20″ Open Form Necklace from Bonnie Bishoff is.

J.M. Syron constructs the nickel silver and sterling silver wire forms which Bonnie covers with polymer patterns. The piece looks fragile but feels surprisingly sturdy because of its metal underpinnings. The colors and stripes shift subtly from link to link.

The couple’s Body Length Necklace shows another example of long slim shapes that appear ethereal and light yet have strength that allows the wearer to twist and twirl all 60″ of beads.

It takes close collaboration to make pieces that feel both well built and elegant.

Going around in circles

Corbin on PolymerClayDaily.com

Loose, colorful, happily twirled polymer beads popped into view this week.

Kathryn Corbin’s necklace starts with big textured peach-colored tubes on a thick cord.

In the center, bigger loops of random surface textures in springy colors overlap and crowd against each other. It’s a fresh and spontaneous look that kept catching my eye in Claire Maunsell’s weekend surface techniques class in Boston. What a great use for the samples we were accumulating in class!

Then Jean Rutka posted pictures from a weekend group event in Morrisburg, Ontario.

One photo featured thin extruded polymer strings that Lyn Tremblay twirled into flat round disks and strung into a fabric-like necklace. On her Facebook page Lyn shows a number of other fun designs that come to her when she lets the clay “speak to her”.

Is this fascination with easily twirled bits of clay a trend or just a reflection of the exuberance of spring?

Musical polymer

Leonini makes music on PolymerClayDaily.com

Look closely at the flipped up edges of the circles in Cecelia Leonini’s necklace. The curls tease and taunt us like the flip of a woman’s hem in an old movie. They offer a peek at something more.

Cecilia’s hot, bright colors come from growing up in Tuscany and living in Sienna, Italy. She taught piano for many years until she ran into a Skinner blend on the internet.

“I found in polymers the same vibrations, sounds and colors of the earth and music. For me the clay is the synthesis of all the arts that I love,” she says.

Cecelia offers an array of energetic, asymmetric jewelry on FlickrFacebook and Instagram which she sells on FoltBolt and Etsy.

If your art made music, what would it sound like?

Simply loopy polymer

Blackburn bangles on PolymerClayDaily.com

Ever since I took a class with Carol Blackburn in Santa Fe, I’ve had an art crush on her impossibly fastidious patterns and the way she makes it all so simple.

Carol will teach some of her clever tricks at a 3-day Purses, Bangles and Beads workshop at Galerie Freisleben in Germany in June. What a dream that would be!

In the meanwhile Carol keeps coming up with more head-slapping designs like this Loopy Links necklace. Of course these softly blended oval shapes would fit into each other.

Blackburn's Loopy Necklace on PolymerClayDaily

Why didn’t we think of that? Spring is a great time to let your own loopy ideas take shape.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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