Belcher’s calming polymer creations

Judy Belcher has been preparing polymer clay samples for an upcoming class and she’s posted them on her Flickr page.

I’m loving her calm, precise patterns and monochromatic color palette after this week’s wild creative rides. We need these deep breaths to restore us.

But Judy’s not altogether calm. She adds surprise and dimension to the pieces with applied cane slices and juxtaposed patterns. The tiny colored o-rings used as spacers add another touch of excitement. Thanks, Judy,

Playful experts – Bohmer and Aaron

Taking a playful approach in the studio has drawn me to others’ playful polymer clay works.

For instance, this loop necklace from Germany’s Margit Böhmer is colorful and carefree with a few bead surprises tucked in the centers. Or you could interpret this as a primitive piece made from rainbow steak bones. Either way, it’s unselfconscious and fun. A browse through Margit’s Flickr site reveals more of her adventurous and capricious spirit.

Israel’s Shay Aaron posted a tiny tutorial of his miniature fish cane. You’ve got to be a bit of a kid to make tiny fish. His sandwich earrings, pizza charms and totally believable small foods are big fun.

Note: In response to your requests, I added a couple of “after” pictures to Friday’s post.

Ronna resonance and guerrilla crafts

The eye-popping color of this polymer clay necklace by Austria’s Carina Feichtinger startled me as I plowed through the web this morning.

Carina credits Ronna’s book for inspiration (see yesterday’s post) though it’s certainly Carina’s own colors and design.

I was also touched by this guerrilla craft, polymer piece from LA’s Lauren Steven which was created for submission to Stampington as a part of Monica Magness’ “AdDRESSing the Situation” campaign to bring awareness of the murders of women in Juarez, Mexico.

The front and back of her piece is shown here. See more of Lauren’s thoughtful works in her Etsy shop.

Global polymer trends

Julie Picarello’s “Boheme” polymer clay necklace reflects a little of a trend you may have spotted. There’s a looser, almost primitive style that’s gaining ground. French polymer artists excel at the look.

Ronna Sarvis Weltman gives step-by-step instructions in her newest book, Ancient Modern, and in the past few weeks I’ve been stunned and delighted by the number of versions her book has spawned.

When a style gets in the air, it starts popping up everywhere. I like how Julie has reinterpreted the wrapped wire look to go with her unmistakable designs (and she may have never seen Ronna’s book…I didn’t check).

Grant Diffendaffer’s workshops have caused a similar phenomenon with experimental recursive molded beads popping up all over the world. Today was my day to catch up on the web and these global waves of new designs really struck me.

Tabakman’s robotic polymer

Laura Tabakman’s latest creation contains 10 mechanisms and computerized polymer clay shapes that undulate, grow and spin on a 3’x6′ base.  See the video here.

Her robotic piece, called Flora, resembles a moving Monet and won best of show at the Pittsburgh Technology Council’s exhibition.

Over the past few months Laura’s been developing organic shapes both in her installation art and in her jewelry (as in this “Cascade” necklace) paying special attention to how the pieces move as they’re worn or approached.

The chronological organization of Flickr gives us a snapshot of an artist’s progress and I think it’s safe to say that Laura’s having a growth spurt.

Thanks to Susan Lomuto (DailyArtMuse) for the link. Have an invigorating weekend.

Beach-inspired tidbits

beach bead

This French polymer clay bead from Céline Charuau at Parole de Pate reminds me of a beachball. There’s a companion tutorial that shows a clever way of making these and I’m intrigued by the necklace. Though the round beads are all the same size, the random combinations of extruded colors make the resulting beads randomly striped.

It’s hard to explain but you’ll get the idea from the pictures.

I abandoned my husband at the beach to find a McDonald’s internet connection. He’s fishing. He won’t notice that I’m gone but I’d better get back. We’re heading home tomorrow.

Did you see Tina Holden’s link to Joan Tayler’s sand dollar cane tutorial?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...


  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


  • Here are 4 ways to get daily posts


  • Download your FREE eBook
    7 Great Ways to Teach Yourself Polymer Clay.
    Contains 62 free resources for learning polymer clay online.

    Click here to download.