Tabakman’s robotic polymer

Laura Tabakman’s latest creation contains 10 mechanisms and computerized polymer clay shapes that undulate, grow and spin on a 3’x6′ base.  See the video here.

Her robotic piece, called Flora, resembles a moving Monet and won best of show at the Pittsburgh Technology Council’s exhibition.

Over the past few months Laura’s been developing organic shapes both in her installation art and in her jewelry (as in this “Cascade” necklace) paying special attention to how the pieces move as they’re worn or approached.

The chronological organization of Flickr gives us a snapshot of an artist’s progress and I think it’s safe to say that Laura’s having a growth spurt.

Thanks to Susan Lomuto (DailyArtMuse) for the link. Have an invigorating weekend.

Beach-inspired tidbits

beach bead

This French polymer clay bead from Céline Charuau at Parole de Pate reminds me of a beachball. There’s a companion tutorial that shows a clever way of making these and I’m intrigued by the necklace. Though the round beads are all the same size, the random combinations of extruded colors make the resulting beads randomly striped.

It’s hard to explain but you’ll get the idea from the pictures.

I abandoned my husband at the beach to find a McDonald’s internet connection. He’s fishing. He won’t notice that I’m gone but I’d better get back. We’re heading home tomorrow.

Did you see Tina Holden’s link to Joan Tayler’s sand dollar cane tutorial?

Toops bead video

Seattle’s Cynthia Toops takes you through the process of making polymer clay beads in this quick and wonderful video. It’s sure to give you breathtaking inspiration and overwhelming studio envy to start your week.

Toops’ jewelry is featured in the installation, A Bead Quiz, on view now at the Seattle Art Museum. Her husband, Dan Adams, has a companion video here.

You might want to look at Cynthia and Dan’s self-published book and her Facere Gallery listings too.

I’m scouting out polymer clay in Chapel Hill, NC today and send my thanks to Carol Simmons for sending me today’s link.

Abarbanel’s polymer dreams and nightmares

Janice Abarbanel overcame her procrastination, angst, doubt and fear and submitted her entry, this Dreams of Tuscany polymer clay necklace, to the Bead Dreams competition by the April 6 deadline.

The sound you may hear is Janice crossing “enter competition” off her list. Sometimes just entering makes you a winner. Here’s an earlier link.

Now for a little tidying of my own…a couple of goodies from my desktop.

Cecelia Mabcrea has posted eight interesting tutorials on her Flickr site. The step-by-step photos and her work are good for a weekend browse. Thanks to MC for the link.

If you haven’t signed up for PrairieCraft’s free online newsletter, do it now. The last issue contained Yetta’s Cabochon Technique and there’s a picture of the results on Donna Kato’s home page. The signup is at the bottom of their page. Have a blooming weekend.

Velmachos sets crockery bits in polymer

New York’s Callie Velmachos shows how to set broken bits of crockery in polymer clay and create a great looking necklace in an article in the spring issue of Belle Armoire Jewelry magazine. You can enjoy some supplemental pictures of the necklace on her web site.

I’m drawn to the vintage, romantic pieces in Belle Armoire which is French for “beautiful wardrobe.” I can’t decide which broken glass, special stone or found object of mine would benefit from Callie’s alluring technique. She makes it look so easy and so “belle.”

Here’s an earlier post on Callie’s ancients.

Polymer spring flowers

I was looking for polymer clay hints of spring to start your week and the daffodils from “SilverPepper23” fit the bill. Her innovative combination of wire, ribbon, seed beads and polymer blooms is impressive.

Problem is, my translators aren’t giving me much more info than the pictures provide. I don’t even know what country we’re looking at. Any help out there?

Israel’s Marcia Tzigelnik (MarsDesign) has a facility for flowers and a reputation for her remarkable rose cane. Her Etsy shop and her Flickr photos are full of inspiration for the season.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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