Hitting the sweet spot

Pondering how Carol Beal works without supervision on PolymerClayDaily.com

Kansas’ Carol Beal (beadunsupervised) hits a sweet spot with this layered pendant. What grabs you? The glowing color? the intersecting lines? The overlapping shapes? Note how the cording color is repeated in a slim sliver on the edge of one layer.

The red stripe finds its way to very small bead at the bottom. Distress on the edges adds an allure too.

Don’t you love the idea of working “unsupervised” with only your very arty self suggesting what to try next? It works for Carol as you can see on Instagram and Flickr.

Groundhog Day


Linda Webb's groundhog predicts six more weeks in the studio on PolymerClayDaily.com

Linda Webb (CreeksideStudio) reminds us that February 2 is Groundhog Day here in the US. Here’s her polymer mosaic pendant of Punxsutawney Phil who predicts how long our winter will last.

Linda makes her chunky geometric mosaics look easy on Instagram.  She has an eye for animal portraits. For the rest of us, a pendant like this might require six more weeks of winter. Happy Groundhog Day.

If you’d like to catch up on what’s happening in the wider world of polymer, come on over to StudioMojo on Saturday mornings. We share lots of tidbits and treats and make sure that your mojo is happy and ready to dive in. 

Secrets from the hardware store

Julie Picarello's secrets come from the hardware store on PolymerClayDaily.com

California’s Julie Picarello has a new batch of focals ready for the annual Tucson bead show next week. She’ll be buying, selling, and teaching her new Lunar Feather Beads.

She prowls through hardware stores and walks the long aisles of the big box stores looking for pieces she can stamp into or otherwise incorporate into her mokume gane designs.

In her Tucson classes, students will learn how to use new tools she appropriated from the HVAC department!

In the group pictured here, Julie gives a nod to textiles but look closely and you’ll see washers and traces of metal. This new series is done in her signature color palettes and sprinkled with painted and torched do-dads. She’s on Facebook here.

Tactile textures

Olga Ledneva's textures and enamels provide a tactile experience on PolymerClayDaily.com

Russia’s Olga Ledneva used Cernit clay and low-tire enamels on this pendant that mixes textures and colors in ways that invite the wearer to fondle the corrugated background and bargello center stripe.

Low fire enamel powders leave a slick and shiny surface. The metal bail and leather cord add to the tactile options. Olga likes to engage the wearer with her pieces. See how she does this on Flickr and Instagram.

Fidget spinning polymer

Fidget spinner mystery from Ebet on PolymerClayDaily

Running into someone as anonymous as Ebeth00Studioe is rare these days. I was deep into Photoshop cutting out this photo when it occurred to me that I should look for background information about Ebeth.

Her Instagram profile left me pretty empty-handed so I’ll have to rely on PCD readers who may know something about her. Country?

Colors sometimes grab me and I’m off to the races. Silhouetting in Photoshop provides my evening meditation. You’d think I’d know to slow down by now but I’m lulled into a familiar routine.

So we know it’s mokume gane of some kind. Maybe it was the fidget spinner bead in the middle that enticed me to play. Does anyone out in PCD-land have some clues?

Contrarian polymer

Lela Todua's bright mixes tell a story on PolymerClayDaily

The slicker and more commercial the holiday frenzy gets, the more I appreciate roughly handmade, Bohemian, tribal, rustic, gypsy, hippie, ethnic designs like this pendant from Ukraine’s Lela Todua (Leland Jewelry).

Lela’s techniques and patterns follow her own whims. She pulls the mix of various textures together with color themes and accents of paint.

I realize that PCD featured Lela’s butterflies just recently. Once my eye locks onto a vibe, I find myself visiting and revisiting a collection to soak it up. Lela builds compelling stories as she picks and chooses an assortment of related components.

Follow her story on Etsy and Instagram.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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