Lam’s leaves

Lam's leaves on PolymerClayDaily.com

Loretta Lam keeps me coasting on photos taken at last week’s conference. These lightweight sculpted leaves are not-quite-finished samples for an upcoming European class.

Even unsanded the shapes were silky smooth. Loretta lays thin fabric-like veneers over FIMOairlight bases.

Thank you for your comments on yesterday’s post that taught me another meaning of the word goolies. While the creatures in the Christi Friesen post are cute, some goolies are certainly better kept not so free!

Freeing your goolies

Friesen's Goolies on PolymerClayDaily.com

Christie Friesen is possessed by Goolies, small polymer sculptures that fly from her fingers.

In Virginia an admiring crowd gathered around the oven, waiting to adopt the figments of Christi’s imagination. She really can’t say where or how the Goolies originate or what they mean. You can see on her Facebook page that she’s made legions of them. And they keep coming.

What do the gremlins, grouches and goofballs that live in your imagination look like? Have you ever tried to capture them in polymer?

Adopted artwork

Jacobs on PolymerClayDaily.com

New Zealand’s Amba Jacobs (TheLittleMew) makes small sculptures and charms based on games and comics and popular culture icons. Here the 2.5″x3″ Dusky Sky Lantern Dragon’s body and feather-like scales are rendered lovingly in pastel sunset colors. It was one of three sculptures auctioned off recently.

When she was a child, Amba liked to rescue kittens, drawn by their vulnerable mews. “My spirit charms are also small, sweet and fragile creatures who want to be adopted,” she says.

She sells her creatures in several online venues (Etsy, Facebook, Instagram, her blog). She shares her methods on her YouTube channel.

Her attention to detail is apparent not only in the carefully crafted works but also in her approach to placing them in good homes. Do you feel like your artwork is up for adoption?

Small farmers

Kratzner's small farmers on PolymerClayDaily.com

We end our week of characters with a tip of the straw hat to small farmers. These guys are from Oregon’s Gesine Kratzner.  She’s an artist/illustrator/animator.

On her website you can see how she moves easily between drawing and sculpting. See these guys in action here.

Her works include Squids, Grumpy Pets, Worry Warts, Astroturf Planets and more strange creatures. You’ll find them on Facebook and Etsy then smile your way through Pinterest and Instagram.

Nothing like a good chuckle to get you in a weekend mood. Join us on StudioMojo if you need more smiles.

Furry polymer

Helen Violet sculptures on PolymerClayDaily.com

Toronto polymer sculptor Helen Violet has a full schedule of commissions for 2017. In late summer/fall of this year she’ll open a shop for those pet lovers hoping to get on the 2018 list and you can read the details of her ordering and pricing here.

Previously an illustrator, Helen created her first polymer and acrylic sculpture in November 2015 as a gift. She was quickly swamped with orders for the 7″ to 8.5″ replicas of favorite pets (like Brutus here) which you can see on Instagram and Facebook.

“This is not a ‘business’ to me, but an opportunity to connect my love for animals with my love for creating and share that with wonderful people who have been touched by their fur friends as well,” Helen says.

What a treat to see polymer art that hits the sweet spot on so many levels!

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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