Polymer clay MealyMonsters

Today I felt like Priscilla, one of the polymer clay mealy monsters. Faced with packing and organizing for a trip out West I was overcome with inertia and ended up sitting, sneezing (allergy season), gazing into space.

These endearing creatures speak to me even though I’m rushing the Halloween season. They’re the creation of Buffalo, NY artist, Nicole Johnson, who describes them as, "whimsical, creepy, fun, strange, cute, weird, one-of-a-kind, decorative, art dolls." You can see a little of her behind-the-scenes work on Flickr and on her blog.

If you share my mood, you’ll enjoy kindred spirits at MonsterEtsy. Now I must go pack, really. Thanks to Susan Lomuto for the link.

Becker’s wild polymer fish

I keep finding things that help me prolong summer. Here are Ella Becker’s polymer clay fantasy fish full of color and glitter and motion.

This Israeli animator admits that, "Animation for me is not only a profession but also a way of experiencing the world in a visual way, full of color, texture and motion, working together to create emotional impact." There is raw energy in her jewelry and sculpture with color and flash that increase its impact. She gives a dynamite haircut too! Something wild for the end of summer.

A new look at cane works

Look at the newest commissions that Alev Gozonar has created for a Turkish hotel using polymer clay cane slices. Her 20″ square sculptural pieces create patterns from fields of slices and remind us that those pretty little designs can be used to make bigger, bolder statements.

Gail Froula McIntyre is displaying her cane work on a new website. I’m loving the innovative use of those fancy circular paperclips as a finding (at least that’s what I’m guessing they are). The link to the new site is from Barbara Fajardo who knows her way around canes too.

Dever at del Mano

My studio is under construction this week (see construction photos here). As long as I’m planning what I want it to look like, it’s a good time to think about readjusting this website as well.

Writing daily has become a comfortable habit but there are days when I fear I sound like an infomercial and I’ll bet you can predict what I’m going to say. Thousands of polymer clay blogs cover our craft. How can PolymerClayDaily continue to be of value to the community?

I’ll be rethinking content this week and I’d love your input. What are you hungry for on the web?

I can’t let your week begin with my whiny rant, however. Here’s a new piece from Jeff Dever who has an August show, Fiber Art Explored II, at LA’s del Mano gallery. These juicy new works should start your week on a high note.

Allard’s life is grand

Melanie Allard is an illustrator/sculptor/animator from Quebec. I was mesmerized by her “Life is Grand” animation (even though it’s probably plasticine). She uses plenty of polymer clay in her work. (Look under “bricolage” which translated to DIY!) Much of her site is in French so I’m guessing again. Here’s her Flickr site and more of her animated work.

Summer living has cut into my research time so I’m happy when artists write in as Melanie did, admiring and linking through to another artist’s work. A bit of summer serendipity.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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