Tame and wild polymer

Pilar Rodriguez Dominguez mixes tame and wild for effect on PolymerClayDaily.com
Pilar Rodriguez Dominguez mixes tame and wild for effect on PolymerClayDaily.com

Spain’s Pilar Rodriguez Dominguez (El Rincon de Amatista) layers flower slices over tiger and leopard cane designs to produce an effect that’s both tame and wild.

Pilar Rodriguez Dominguez mixes tame and wild for effect on PolymerClayDaily.com

The combination seems odd but it works in this necklace.

Isn’t that often the way it works? If it makes sense in your world, follow that and people will stop and take note.

Bottled up feelings

Carole Monahan intends to bottle her feelings on PolymerClayDaily.com

Connecticut’s Carole Monahan (CuriousClayCreations on Instagram) made little emoji for her guild’s upcoming open studio.

Aren’t they totally cute? Little balls of yellow textured with the appropriate face and accentuated with paint.

Carole says the whole series will be displayed in a bottle she’s labeled FEELINGS. Who wouldn’t like these as magnets, pins, or earrings?

No two the same

No two of Wanda Shum's snowflakes are alike on PolymerClayDaily.com

These samples are from Victoria, B.C.’s Wanda Shum. She usually uses her cane slices to cover teapots and make bowls and jewelry. Now for an ornament class.

Her Papercut Snowflake Cane workshop brings back fond memories of creating snowflakes from folded paper. Wanda’s method also appeals because it allows you to control the chaos of a kaleidoscope cane.

You’ll find more samples on Instagram and on Facebook.

Swapping with style

Joan Tayler's ball chain idea makes swapping fun again on PolymerClayDaily

Ohio neighbor, Nancy Nearing, traveled to Vancouver to visit her daughter and to meet up with Joan Tayler who has a thriving polymer business at the Granville Island Public Market (and on Etsy).

Joan sent PCD readers a super new idea for small art to trade and collect.  If inchies and totems and bowls have lost their swap thrill in your group, consider her new method.

She recommends baking beads directly on short lengths of ball chain (1 1/2″ or so). Sandwich the chain between two slices of cane or devise your own style.  Join the individual pieces together with connectors and make them into necklaces, bracelets, keychains, whatever.

Joan made all these beads on this sample. Beads coming from far and wide might look very different.

Once your group agrees on a color and size of ball chain, you have an easy swap. Brilliant, eh? Thanks, Joan and Nancy!

StudioMojo heads west! Travel along and see who we run into. Join us!

 

 

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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