Botton transfers fabrics

The textiles from her day job in China have crept into French artist Cecilia Botton’s (Mabcrea) newest work. Cecilia’s obviously comfortable with crossing borders and mixing cultures.

The caption on this new monochromatic necklace says that she’s using a transfer technique and transfers catch my attention these days. She promises to create a tutorial soon.

Her Flickr pages are filled with experiments and exercises. She credits the work and artists who inspire her and lets us watch as she works out her versions. Cecilia also offers a bunch of fun step-by-step visual tutorials which are easy to understand in any language.

Eakes’ polymer gifts

Julie Eakes offers a nifty poinsettia tutorial on her blog. She collages slices from four or five basic canes onto a graduated background for one variation. Then she shows how the same canes can be used for sculptural or dimensional pieces. What a nice gift to readers.

If you’ve caught the generous spirit of the holidays, you may want to:

Thanks to Susan Lomuto at DailyArtMuse and Lindly Haunani for the links.

Polymer with a light touch

I’m feeling clumsy and in a rush. Polymer clay works that exude a light touch and a delicate sensibility inspire me and calm me down.

The bracelet is from Enkhene Tserenbadam from Switzerland. Offsetting the comfortable textured shapes makes them more touchable. The oversized jump rings on her new necklaces add an element of surprise.

The glowing hollow translucent bead is from France’s Céline Charuau (GrisBleu). She has a little tutorial on her site that shows you how she assembles beauties like these.

Austria’s Eva Ehmeier (Hoedlgut) shows her refined elegant Black Meadow Necklace on her Flickr site. Ok, breathe deeply. Back to the studio.

Treasurefield’s fee fi faux

This sunny Rosa Amarilla polymer clay necklace and enamel-look swallow pin from Alisa Treasurefield look sunny and just right for the first post of the week.

Alisa specializes in unusual faux effects – wood, enamel, bakelite, ceramic, metal and more – in the items in her Etsy shop.

It takes a keen eye and a deft hand to use the clay so convincingly. In an earlier post we looked at her faux faceted wood gems and now there’s much more to look at.

Distractions

Here are two tutorials I found this weekend as I tried to distract myself from other chores that were calling me. Both the faux agate cane and the twisted wire/polymer ring look interesting and need little translation. If you experiment with them, I can get back to work.

Davis’ faux fossils

Lynn Davis makes polymer clay faux ceramic beads like no one else. In her recent post she lets us peer over her shoulder as she finishes a batch.

Repeated painting and buffings give her beads a patina and hints of past lives. These faux fossils are particularly alluring and the use of links instead of holes in the beads makes them even more unusual. Her Etsy shop shows a great selection.

If, like me, you want to know how to get started, take a look at this polymerclayweb tutorial. Here’s an earlier post about Lynn.

Hyde’s polymer angels

Discussions about holiday spirit wouldn’t be complete without mentioning another of my polymer clay favorites, Seattle’s Susan Hyde. She sent these two examples of her latest angels dressed in her signature colors with extruded clay slices as accents. Those colors are pure holiday eye candy.

Her fabric tutorial (a Skinner blend with shreds of contrasting color mixed in and stacked into plaids) is one of the best for polymer clay color lovers.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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