Strong simplicity

nells_dottir

Jayne Flanagan’s (nellsdottir) necklaces caught my eye and you’ll be surprised at who visited Nell’s booth in Sydney.

I’m on the road and weary so you’ll have to unravel this mystery yourself from Jayne’s Instagram page or from Facebook or Pinterest,  Her painted polymer pieces like these Squiggly beads have a strong and fashionable simplicity.

I have a few more hours of podcasts to enjoy as I drive across the midwest. More news from the road when I arrive at my destination tomorrow.

From Skinner blend to sunset

St. James on PCDaily

It’s your week at the beach with polymer. Today JoAnne St. James replicates Connecticut sunsets and beach scenes. She translates the sky colors into beautiful Skinner blends. It’s a short step from a blend to landscape.

St. James on PCDaily

A handful of shells, some sand, sun touching the water – JoAnne gives the scenes finishing touches and then turns them into wearable summer memories.

You can witness her magic on Facebook and Etsy and catch more beach bits on Pinterest. Her about page tells you her story.

Polymer seahorse rodeo

Be careful! This Seahorse Rodeo from Utah’s MaryAnne Loveless may rope you in and drag you under with patterns and colors and shapes.

MaryAnne often creates her beads and sculptures in big groups. A look at her Flickr gallery (also Pinterest) shows the logic of repeating a design until you get the feel of it and have worked out all the challenges and rough spots. You also see what an impression a big collection can make.

A tip of the beach hat to MaryAnne for bringing us these 3″ tall polymer broncos.

Loveless on PCDaily

Polymer cover-up

Petricoin on PCDaily

Pennsylvania’s Beth Petricoin loves polymer and upcycling. A favorite shirt ruined by bleach spots could have been discarded or demoted but Beth couldn’t let that happen. She decided to hide the problem with a radiating design in polymer.

She fabricated the components from thin pieces of polymer cut out and applied with Sculpey Bake and Bond. “I worked in segments of about 6″ by 8″, curing in between segments to keep the areas for curing totally flat in the oven,” says Beth.

She details her project step-by-step in a blog post. She even laundered the shirt after finishing to test the glue’s strength and gives it a definite thumbs up.

“I can hardly wait to jazz up another piece of clothing! I can also see this idea put into use to cover up unwanted holes in clothing….lots of ideas running around in my head,” she admits.

Follow other of Beth’s polymer experiments on Flickr, Etsy, Pinterest and her blog. What’s in your closet begging for an upcycle?

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

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