Getting your house in order

Lindsay Black commits homes to memory on PolymerClayDaily

Though many of us consider creating our home as a piece of polymer art, few of us get started in April as Tennessee’s Lindsay Black (oddlyandcompany) does.

The early start leaves her time to work on small details like the birdfeeder, the shrubbery, and the cats.

Go to Lindsay’s Instagram to see her step-by-step. It’s oddly comforting to watch her in-progress shots. She says there are details she misses even after staring at the piece for hours on end.

Spring blossoms

Subtly striped blossoms from Pavla Cepelikova

Expect flowers this week. We’re in bloom and they’re popping up online too!

These earrings from Czech Republic’s Pavla Cepelikova (SaffronAddict) use her subtle stripe tricks from a recent tutorial. (Full disclosure, I bought the tutorial and am hooked.)

Thin slices of striped cane are backed by companion colors which are repeated in the center balls. Springy, trendy, blooming studs to start your week.

Polymer in the air

Emily Squires Levine's trees go to Washington on PolymerClayDaily.com

Emily Squires Levine’s dense and colorful Magical Copse bowl will be among the artworks for sale at the Smithsonian Craft Show in Washington DC April 26-29.

She joins a select group of polymer artists in this premier crafts show. From over 1000 applicants,120 are chosen to participate. We’ve come a long way from hippie beads to welcomed participants in fine crafts. See more of Emily’s works on Flickr.

At StudioMojo, the weekend behind-the-scenes newsletter, we marvel at where artists are showing and where we may end up next. If your art needs a shot of inspiration and a push toward new possibilities, join us!

Spring palette, stacked flowers

California’s Meisha Barbee took Carol Simmons flower class when Carol came to San Diego in early April. You can spot Carol’s refined kaleidoscopic methods in a heartbeat.

Meisha carried out the project in her own distinctive palette and with a quirky stripe here and a peppy dot there.

Her palette of colors mixed with Carol’s instructions look perfect on PCD on a colorful spring day.

See Meisha’s interesting history on PCDaily.

Delicate botanicals

Paris’ Cécile Bos (11prunes) worked as a biology researcher before she happened on polymer. Her approach to caning is small, as you might expect, and resembles textile design. You can catch the drift of her thinking from this photo collage on her website.

Blocks of small designs on a matching background are created and then combined into a repeating design.

The finished patterns are quite delicate and small, just the right size for her delicate pendants and long thin tubes. She’s on Instagram and Facebook.

Mid-week is the right time to think about changing directions. Cecile has opted for smaller and more delicate works.

Improv polymer

Jan Geisen capitalizes on her scraps on PolymerClayDaily.com

Minnesota’s Jan Geisen considers herself an improv artist. The scraps interest her much more than neat and tidy patterns.

Here she jumps on the wire trend and a wire ring comes to the front and then the back of this unusual layered necklace with circles and rough edges. See all of her improvisations on Flickr.

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  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


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