Polymer that echoes

Jumin Bae makes us reexamine what we know on PolymerClayDaily.com

South Korea’s Junmin Bae makes our heads spin with her scrutiny of beauty and bizarreness in the movements of micro-objects. Her polymer shapes fluidly increase and decrease as if under a microscope.

We don’t know whether we should fondle these shapes or be repulsed by them. We sense echoes of insect eggs, tumors, and cells.

This puts our craft in an exciting predicament. Do we love it? Do we hate it?  Nevermind, her polymer work puts us directly in the midst of contemporary questions. Exciting works with a fresh approach!

 

Polymer street art

CityZenKane CZK's polymer works sprout on walls in the UK on PolymerClayDaily.com

Whenever I travel I train my eyes to scan for polymer. It sometimes appears in unlikely places.

In London, for instance, the elusive CityZenKane CZK on Instagram(not to be confused with the early business name of Ford & Forlano) mounts his guerrilla art on buildings and street corners.

Ten years ago CZK used polymer for the finished pieces but now he sculpts in polymer and then casts a silicone mold which he fills with resin. It’s educational (and somewhat trippy) to look at the videos of his work, his inspirations, and his installations.

This week I traveled to San Diego and my eyes spied several polymer artists in the studios at Spanish Village Art Center, a collection of galleries in Balboa Park adjacent to the city’s museums and its famous zoo. In StudioMojo I’ll share the photos and tips picked up from our West coast street artists. Join us for the rest of the story. 

Rescue polymer

Dayna Corbitt creates a weekly offering of lovingly crafted animals on PolymerClayDaily.com

Illinois’ Dayna Corbitt (Whimsycalling) raises money for animal rescue with her very popular painted polymer animal sculptures.

Her understanding of animals shines through in her meticulously painted and lovingly crafted pieces.

Dayna stocks her shop with a new batch of items every two weeks. Updates usually sell out in minutes.

Here she asks her Instagram followers which tiger or panther they prefer from this week’s (5/31/19) offerings. No commissions, no special orders. Dayna shows us what happens when you narrow your focus to what makes your heart sing.

Dotted Mandalas

Susan Downs Reed's meditative patterns create ancient Greek art on PolymerClayDaily.com

These Triangle Women were created recently at Clayathon. I wish I’d learned more about this graphic artist and ancient history enthusiast Susan Downs Reed and her husband Ken.

From the fans’ comments on Facebook, you’ll see that these are based on ancient Greek figures from 800-500 BCE. Susan clarifies that ” I am inspired by artifacts from ancient Hallstatt culture. Hallstatt culture is believed by many archaeologists and prehistorians to be the oldest Celtic culture.”

I did manage to find out how Susan cuts all the patterns for her sculptures and mandalas. It’s labor-intensive and fascinating as you’ll see in this 1-minute tutorial.  More on Flickr.

When pigs…

What is Alice Stroppel telling us with her flying pigs on PolymerClayDaily.com?

Sometimes it’s clear what message polymer artists want to tell us.

What could Florida’s Alice Stroppel possibly be communicating with her latest edition of flower-covered pigs with wings?

Alice hints that “Serious fun happens when pigs fly.”  There’s no holding Alice back. Her pigs will happily fly whenever she wants them to. There’s a lot we could learn from the spunky, irreverent Alice.

Speaking of unexpected fun, come on over to this week’s StudioMojo where we follow Into the Forest exhibit creators Laura Tabakman, Julie Eakes and Emily Squires Levine. Teaching their polymer methods to incarcerated women was a more joyful experience than they ever anticipated. Come find out why. 

Wackadoodle bunnies

Nicole Johnson's Wackadoodle bunnies hop right out of her shop on PolymerClayDaily.com

New York’s Nichol Johnson (mealymonster) creates Wackadoodle bunnies that have scampered right out of her online store. They’re so cute that they’re hard to catch!

How can you not fall for a purple big-eyed polka-dotted creature that looks quite scared?

Watch them dance on Nichol’s Instagram.

Hop right over to StudioMojo if you want to catch up with this week’s polymer news. There are two more tutorials from Clayathon plus lots of spring creations. It’s the perfect remedy for your spring fever. Join us!

Natasha bugs

Bugs crawl out of Gael Keyes' scrap pile on PolymerClayDaily

New Mexico’s Gael Keyes makes fantastical bugs and beetles with fancy wire legs dressed in polymer and beaded antennae. They’re composed of scrap clay twisted into a Natasha bead pattern to create the bookend pattern on their backs and wings.

Polymer is a family affair with Gael. She’s here at Claython in New Jersey with her mother (Carole Centrella) and sister (Linda O’Brien). Retired from a school principal job, Gael’s online exposure had to be limited. She launched onto Instagram today! Follow her.

 

Dustin’s students’ purse beginnings

Kathleen Dustin students sculpt their purse shapes on PolymerClayDaily

What is so soothing about the golden shapes from students in Kathleen Dustin’s purse class in Georgia? The forms have a round-edged, ponderous, shape that puts me in mind of Henry Moore sculptures.

This “before” shot may make you scurry over to the Creative Journeys Facebook to see the “after” shots here.

The student work gives me “class envy.” You too? It’s almost spring and time to wake up our spirits with a class.

There’s no hiding in polymer


Miranda Farrand mirrors my mood on PolymerClayDaily.com

Funny how what I choose each day reflects my mood. This severed head from Ohio’s Miranda Farrand (MirandasCritters) looks spot on. Damned head cold.

Makes you wonder what’s in Miranda’s head, doesn’t it? She seems normal but strange things fly off her fingers when she picks up a hunk of clay. See more on Facebook.

I was feeling quite smug when my friends suffered through germy maladies this winter. Not so smug now. My cold medicine was 10 years out of date but it did the trick.

You know what’s good when you’re feeling sniffly? Cups of ginger tea, kleenex, and sifting through links on your phone! Tomorrow’s StudioMojo will be full of polymer wonders I sorted out just for you. Gather with us for the results of my deep dive.

Better than hearts

Candid moments in polymer from Maria Saracino on PolymerClayDaily.com

The polymer sculptures from Canada’s Maria Saracino will melt your heart in this week of romance.

This couple is part of a 10″x24″x6″ sculpture on view at Montreal’s Shane Gallery. Through her figurative sculptures, Maria tries to trigger a memory or feeling in the viewer.

Having started her career in illustration, Marie says that it was Norman Rockwell who influences her most as she tries to capture candid moments in time.

Her commissioned works will warm your heart. Follow her on Instagram.

 

 

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