Pan pastel relics

Marina Rios makes modern relics with pan pastels on PolymerClayDaily

What look like ancient relic beads were cooked up by Marina Rios (fancifuldevices) using a combination of pan pastels and paste wax on polymer. Looks like some heat was applied too. Rough and ancient yet colorful.

We’ve got additional pan pastel tricks for you on StudioMojo this week. I may not have cooked much this Thanksgiving but I stumbled on some tasty studio recipes for you. No leftovers, just fresh ideas and inspiration for your weekend. 

Polymer pile up

Fabi Perez Ajates piles up her jewelry on PolymerClayDaily.com

Spain’s Fabi Perez Ajates (Con Tus Manos) makes stacks of beads and bangles and brooches look like fascinating ceramic sculptures.

The holes and ridges and shapes in her imitative ceramic pieces all have dual purposes.

They can be worn or piled up in endlessly entertaining ways that form totems.

Fabi Perez Ajates piles up her jewelry on PolymerClayDaily.com

Fabi calls this her Coraline Jewelry since the pieces were inspired by oceanic reefs. 

Scroll down Fabi’s blog to see how she plays with her jewelry. (via Sue Ossenberg)

Love beads

Aow Dusdee's psychedelic beads take us back on PolymerClayDaily.com

Thailand’s Aow Dusdee makes beads that burst with the psychedelic colors of the early days of polymer. The shapes are updated and the tassels are trendy but Aow’s beaded pulls and dangles have an unmistakable 60’s hippie vibe.

They harken back to days of youthful protests of another era and give us hope that today’s passion and energy will become a breakthrough moment for societal repair.

“Smile on my face. Love in my heart. Peace in my mind. Color in my life. Creativity in my soul. Wanna share it with the world,” says her tagline. Her Facebook will put you in the Wayback Machine.

Summer pistachio, slate, lilac, salmon

Angela Garrod takes a calm, subtle approach to summer on PolymerClayDaily.com

The UK’s Angela Garrod gears up for summer with these Sugar in the Air necklaces.

“Simplicity in itself for summer,” she says. Each necklace is 16″ long in pistachio and slate and lilac and salmon.

Similar streaks of white unite the colors and the soft summer vibe.

The sizes aren’t perfectly alike which emphasizes its handmade aura. We’re comforted by Angela’s sedated colors. No drama, no in-your-face, look-at-me attitude. Good for this Friday, right?

We’ll be looking at Conscious Creating and Creative Composting in polymer on StudioMojo this week. Things shifted in our lives this week. We’re connected. We know we have to work together. Once we get past the anxiety and panic, we can see the upside of this difficult time. 

Polymer in Japan

Yukari Tateuchi offers a taste of Japanese polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Japan’s Yukari Tateuchi (ycollection) was introduced to polymer in 1995. That was about the time when Nan Roche and Kaz Kono were busy in Japan though there may be no connection. I like to think that’s when polymer seeds were planted. 

On her class page, she notes that, “It is even better if you bring your own slippers. The workplace is small and dirty,” There are interesting stories here!

These disks covered with monochromatic canes have a soothing, minimalist and modern feel about them. Go explore her aesthetic on her pages.

Bright colors reflect a bright spirit

Polymer and a bright spirit helped Rachel face challenges and look forward to a bright spring on PolymerClayDaily.com

If the holidays are truly over, spring can’t be far behind, right?

Need a shot of springy colors? Here’s a super one from the UK’s Rachel (madebyracheluk)

Her colors remind you that brighter days are coming and her story will certainly lift your spirits. Rachel had her heart set on a career in medical science but health challenges made her change directions.

The bright colors reflect the bright and determined spirit of the artist. Here’s Rachel’s story on Facebook. Her can-do spirit shines through in these delightfully colored flower cane beads gathered into bouquets on a string.

Polymer petroglyphs

Deb Harts debuts new Southwest inspired imitative inlays on PolymerClayDaily

Texas’ Deb Hart shows the start of these petroglyphs on Instagram but how she arrives at the small squares with caned petroglyph images in the middle is still baffling.

They are built into an extruded string outline. Wow, that looks labor-intensive. She’s releasing more photos of her progress on the new inlays as she goes.

Here, she shows a Zuni Bear petroglyph and a coiled snake. Maybe she’s gearing up for a tutorial about her newly developed methods.

See an overview of Deb’s Southwest and Native American-inspired sculptures and jewelry on Flickr.

Planting bits of clay

Eva Thissen captures Saturday on a bead on PolymerClayDaily.com

Germany’s Eva Thissen says that she doesn’t work as intensively with polymer these days but she still enjoys it immensely. Her current crop of minutely appliqued beads has already sold on Etsy after only days. 

Eva used to create narratives around a single character. Now her stories are bigger and focused on groups as in this community garden, part of her Saturday series.

Eva Thissen captures Saturday on a bead on PolymerClayDaily.com

It’s hard to imagine working this small. A needle, good eyes, and steady hands are the only tools required.

Faceted and striped

Alessia Bodini treats us to both facets and strips on her beads on PolymerClayDaily.com

Italy’s Allesia Bodini keeps her options open. When confronting the decision of whether her beads should be faceted or striped, she merely says “Yes.”

Are they cut from solid blocks of stripes? Or created as faceted beads and covered with slices of stripes? Is it too early in the week for this brain teaser?

Inquiring minds want to know. Take another look on Facebook.