Tips and Tricks

Off-kilter polymer

Who doesn’t feel a shiver of delight as a Skinner blend drops down from between the rollers of a pasta machine?

I know there are millions of ways to layer, scratch, pound, and twist clay into intricate patterns. Yes, you can add bling, paints, inks, and sparkles. But for my money, nothing compares to the thrill of color.

These circles are from a blend (teal/fuschia/zinc) that I rolled endlessly today. The jaunty disks were inspired by a friend’s thrift store find. Her necklace was made of wooden disks. “Wouldn’t that look great in polymer?” I thought.

An off-center hole sideways through each of the smaller disks keeps the flat rounds bumping against each other in the most energetic way. It was so simple and it pleases me. What could be better than that?


Join us on Saturday mornings when StudioMojo brings a week’s worth of new ideas and inspiration to your inbox. Try it! You’ll see.

Fashionable fall polymer

Amanda rakes leaves for her fall designs on PolymerClayDaily.com

If it’s August (how did that happen) you know that autumn leaves won’t be far behind. Let’s get an early start with these dangling lovelies from Montana’s Amanda (speckled_designs).

Amanda gives you a leg up with a look at last year’s favorites plus in-process shots of her earring assembly. The designs are elegant and simple in a fall palette updated for today’s fashion.

Waste not polymer

Linda Loew turns dabs of leftover pan pastels into wearables on PolymerClayDaily.com
Linda Loew turns dabs of leftover pan pastels into wearables on PolymerClayDaily.com

Maryland’s Linda Loew cleaned the pan pastel residue from her sponges directly onto a slab of light clay.

Here’s the result of her abstract clean-up paired with other extraneous bits and turned into painterly earrings and pendant.

Sometimes our scraps scream to be saved.

Polymer/laser combo

Cynthia Gougian-Fisher adds polymer to her laser-cut frames on PolymerClayDaily.com

Georgia’s Cynthia Gougian-Fisher can’t resist new technology. That doesn’t mean she’s leaving polymer behind.

She cut these wooden earring frames on a laser cutter and then gave them pattern, color, and shine by inlaying polymer. Lots more on Instagram.


In this week’s StudioMojo you’ll watch Texas’ Paula Kennedy hand sand her bowls to a smooth, satiny finish. And you’ll learn how shoe paste wax and face cream are part of her brilliant process. 

A bouquet of sticks

Linda Velas-Helton begins a decorative bouquet of sticks on PolymerClayDaily.com

I’ve been gaga for polymer-covered sticks for years. Mine are more slapdash than these carefully covered twigs from Detroit’s Linda-Velas-Helton.

Scraps, a schmear of liquid clay as glue, tiny cane bits, lots of this and that add up to a glorious trip down memory lane. The wood will tolerate the heat but you may have to use a big oven.

Before you know it, you have a bouquet of past projects to display and decorate your home. Isn’t it amazing how a theme, a palette, an aesthetic emerge from all those diverse projects?

Scratching out and idea

Belinda Broughton cuts her pastel painting into earrings on PolymerClayDaily.com

Australia’s Belinda Broughton (polymerbelinda) could have stopped right here. She applied pan pastels to a sheet of polymer. Then she scratched through the top layer of jagged triangles (technically sgraffito) to make an even more dynamic design.

Pop that baby in the oven and hang it on the wall!

I saw a painting but Belinda had earrings in mind. Either way, it was fun to watch and may make you reconsider pastel possibilities.

When dots collide

Petra Volavšek makes dots collide into jewelry on PolymerClayDaily.com

Have you got a “thing” for dots? Join the crowd. Slovenia’s Petra Volavšek (oceana_jewelry) is one of us!

She gathers her dots into many configurations, making them collide in an unending array of patterns. Monochrome or multicolored dots in a variety of sizes cluster to form jewelry with soothing patterns that look like they may have escaped from a chemistry lab. Let’s see where she takes her experiments next.

 

Paste and polymer

Leah Lester uses high voltage color on PolymerClayDaily.com

Seattle’s Leah Lester (LittleLazies) started as a full-time cake decorator in a small Bakery in Virginia. She sculpted with edible sugar paste and fondant until she discovered polymer in 2010. Read her story in this Discover Geek interview.

Her mix of monsters, cuteness and high voltage colors is a huge hit and perfect for Cinco de Mayo.

Spring slotted flowers

Anne (Baublehaus_) reminds us how to draw tulips #polymerclaydaily https://wp.me/pegT3-7iZ

Did you draw tulips like this as a kid? Me too. Which may be why Seattle’s Anne (from Baublehaus_) is so absolutely right today.

Slotted shapes of leaves and flowers are slipped together to bring simple tulip blooms and leaves to life in polymer. What could be better?