Polymer packs a punch

Anita Kennerley gets in your face with her polymer message on PolymerClayDaily.com

Georgia’s Anita Kennerley shows how polymer can pack a punch. She calls her 4 1/2″ round piece Rona Rules. Crocheted red dots are tucked in between textured and torn bits of silver clay with a tattooed fist that gets in your face with a message.

What a powerful way to emphasize the number one rule for fighting this virus.

Anita has great spirit and she never pulls her punches. Here she is on Facebook.

Easter heirlooms

Deb Hart shows you how to make an heirloom for Easter on PolymerClayDaily.com

Texas’ Deb Hart gets a jump on Easter with her polymer mosaic eggs. Deb has an unusual way of filling in around her central elements and defining the spaces with thin border canes and fine repeating patterns.

No time to make them? Deb offers 50% off her own finished eggs or her tutorials until April 13. (Use promo code Easter2020.) Her workbooks are all 50% off through the end of May while we keep our families safe at home.

You’ll also find Deb’s polymer designs with a southwest flavor on Craftcast and Facebook.

Strung out

Alice Stroppel offers a free tutorial. Add your portrait to her online gallery. PolymerClayDaily.com

Looking for a free tutorial that will bring you back into the present and give you a stress break? Florida’s Alice Stroppel offers just that. Access the tutorial here.

Squirt polymer through the spaghetti-like disks (the ones with multiple holes) of your extruder and get busy making a portrait from the strings. No, extruder? Roll long snakes by hand or use your medium of choice.

The tutorial is broken into four short steps. It may be just the thing you need to get your hands back on clay.

Alice wants to create an online gallery of “Self Portraits in the Time of Isolation” Add yours via the link. Any media welcome.

Studio Mojo will look at helping you deal with the shockwave of events and keep you looking at  “What is” instead of getting stuck with the less predictable and less helpful “What if”. Join us. 

Getting the blues

Betsy Baker feels the blues along with hidden gems on PolymerClayDaily.com

“All this sheltering in place is giving me the blues,” says Boston’s Betsy Baker (Stonehouse Studio).

Are you surprised by the small gem tucked in the middle of Betsy’s folded layers of polymer? There are gems hidden in this hardship and heartache. Look closely.

Tap into your glow

Terri Wlaschin brings passion to her energetic collages on PolymerClayDaily.com

These small tribal mask brooches from Key West, Florida’s Terri Wlaschin (Shanty Chic Beads) are sculpted, collaged, painted and textured with great energy and spirit.  “I am continually inspired by what I see riding my bike around town, walking the beaches, and observing the colorful characters that inhabit this island,” says Terri.

“I did not even know I had a creative side until my late 30’s when I started dabbling in creative writing and photography. When I began working with beads, I couldn’t stop. I never really knew what having a passion for something was until then. It’s like a religious experience to me, bringing joy and a glow to my spirit.”

Thanks to Sharene Screws for the link to an article about Terri in Jewelry Making Journal. Go with your glow!

Back with a splash!

Wendy Moore comes back online with a splash on PolymerClayDaily.com

While most of us are squirreled up at home, Australia’s Wendy Moore (after_the_monsoon) comes back online with a splash.

Wendy’s been watching quietly from the sidelines for a while as she took a break. Now she’s collaborating with Dissonance Fashion and creating new work inspired by Helen Breil and Bonnie Bishoff. Wendy’s resurgence shows us the value of taking time off!

Of course, her heart is never far away from the ladies of the Samunnat Nepal project that she has nurtured since 2006. Welcome back to good health and polymer, Wendy.

Make time on Wednesday for the free Fun At One on Craftcast. This week watch Deb Hart create her polymer eggs and see Deb Karash (prismacolor on metal) demo her black block tool.

Moving hands move you

Wiwat Kamolpornwijit shifts his perspective with a new bracelet on PolymerClayDaily.com

Virginia’s Wiwat Kamolpornwijit calms his jittery nerves with a new spring line. This bracelet with magnetic closure reads differently depending on your perspective.

Patterned circles bend to reveal black and white graphics. “I’m too tired of being worried,” says Wiwat. “I started getting my hands on polymer again, and it really helped getting my mind in the right place.”

Would your mind feel better if your hands started moving?

Ethnicity in the details

Jaishree Chowdhary adds great ethnic details onto simple shapes on #polymerclaydaily

New Delhi’s Jaishree Choudhary (JudaMani) creates mostly items based on Indian themes. These masks have more of an African flavor.

The features are added with a few rolls for lips and eyes and sharp triangular-shaped noses.

Jaishree Chowdhary adds great ethnic details onto simple shapes on polymerclaydaily.com

The colors add drama along with carved and textured details. Looking at the mask bases may tempt you to try to create your own tribe.

Jaishree has been working for several years to bring realism to her polymer figures and faces. Even her unpainted tiles have great power in their simple shapes adorned with abundant and accurate details.

Where do I our ideas spring from? That’s one of the subjects we’ll look at in this weekend’s StudioMojo. We found a fun and surprising story about how “what goes around, comes around.” Come on over to StudioMojo for a smile and a surprise. 

Pointillist polymer

Arieta Stavrodou's powerful polymer pointilism on PolymerClayDaily.com

I know very little about Cyprus’ Arieta Stavrodou except that she’s a strong, in-your-face, badass kinda woman.

And I want to paint like she does with polymer. Her 5″ x 6″ portrait is aggressive, driven, forceful with a soft underbelly and a discerning eye.

We’ve covered her wild teapots and other quirky works but her latest polymer paintings reveal something more.

See the power in her recent Instagram and follow her earlier works on Facebook.

Animal natures in clay

Leslie Blackford's bunnies gather in the spring on PolymerClayDaily.com

Friends came back from a weekend class with Kentucky’s Leslie Blackford gushing about how much they’d learned about clay…and themselves.

There’s something touching, innocent, and vulnerable in Leslie’s unending series of loveable animal sculptures. How does she do that?

For the next few weeks, she will show how she imbues simple sculpted animals with irresistible qualities.

Class details are on Facebook. The tutorials are accessible, inexpensive and just the kind of play your inner child may be yearning for in rough times.

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