There are dots and there are dots

And then there are dots by Madrid’s Silvia Ortiz De La Torre. She’s been making her blended, layered, high voltage colored, roughly textured dotted beads for years.

Silvia has stayed way ahead of the trends. We can learn a thing or two from her.


We go back and forth on StudioMojo. Every weekend we look at artists who’ve been around for years while we also keep up with the fresh faces that bumped into polymer during our forced confinement. Both vantage points teach us. Come see what we see.

Tied in knots


Amy Koranek's prototype for a new twist on Souffle on PolymerClayDaily.com

Sculpey brand ambassador Amy Koranek cured strands of Souffle and then consulted YouTube for how to tie the pliable strings into a decorative knot. Now to finish the piece with a closure. This was an in-progress shot from our recent in-person event in Ohio (Buckeye Bash).

Leaning over shoulders as artists work out new ideas is a terrific way to learn and see where trends are headed.


If you like being on the cutting edge, join us at StudioMojo. Every Saturday sit down with a cuppa and follow links to the most happening events and most clever products about to come to market. We scour our sources to keep you up to the minute. Join us tomorrow.

Matchy matchy

A new necklace from Laurel Swetnam updates an old favorite on PolymerClayDaily.com

Oregon’s Laurel Swetnam was bummed that her schedule forces her to miss her friends’ Clayathon class about using what’s in your closet to come up with new palettes and patterns.

Laurel grabbed a much-loved top that gives her a sunny glow every time she puts it on and headed to her studio to try out the concept.

She scored! Her riff on the pattern includes dotted and striped tubes that enhance but don’t compete with the flowery batik pattern.

If you’d like some pointers about how you can mix and match accurately without going overboard, grab a seat in the online class with Shelley Atwood and Joan Tayler.

Give your old favorites new life.


StudioMojo lets you in on all sorts of behind-the-scenes happenings every Saturday. Sign up here!

 

 

Squiggly tubes

Isis Blackstock makes modern squiggles in polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Isis Blackstock(littlepiecesjewelry) made me explore further.

It seems counter-intuitive that you can bend an extruded tube and still maintain the hole. The joys of polymer!

I’m remembering earlier variations on the idea from Lindly Haunani, Ford/Forlano, and Pier Voulkas. Oh, that takes me back.

Isis explores this concept, applying it to a wide range of bangles and necklaces.

She offers them in monochrome colors but what if you covered the tube with pattern? I’m talking to myself here. I really must try this.

Studio in a go-bag

Sarah Shriver's distinctive colors shine through her new style on PolymerClayDaily.com

California’s Sarah Shriver sounds tentative when she talks about her new collection of painted circle necklaces. She’s been a polymer artist for decades and this minimalist style is a departure. One admirer said the circles reminded her of tiddlywinks, the kids’ game.

Sarah’s complex cane work and signature color palette have been distinctive. But the past year and now fear of wildfire have shifted her thinking. She has to be able to move at a moment’s notice. She’s pared down.

These circles painted with layers of Genesis and strung on silk thread contain Sarah’s same rich and luscious colors but with a nod to efficiency and minimalism.

She’s also been refining mobiles and hollow translucent beads and more. Her new directions reflect the smart, adaptive strategy that our times require.

Balancing demands

Betsy Baker considers demands on her time on PolymerClayDaily.com

Catch a good look at these shimmering hollow big beads from Boston’s Betsy Baker (StonehouseStudio). She made this labor-intensive patterned series during the lockdown.

“Now that life and shows are getting back to normal, I won’t have time,” she says.

Seclusion also gave Betsy time to dabble in designing and making dresses. Take a look at her Instagram.

Are there favorites that you’ll have to set aside now that demands for your time are changing?

Moose Jaw Monday

Jude Radwanski connects to other artists on PolymerClayDaily.com

Jude Radwanski (fireflyartjewellery) reached out to fellow Canadian Helen Breil in an attempt to meet other polymer artists. Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, doesn’t have much of a clay community.

Jude Radwanski connects to other artists on PolymerClayDaily.com

After a 30-year career in interior design, Jude transitioned to polymer. The Saskatchewan Craft Council came up with a new “wearable craft” category to be able to include her in their shows.

Her scribed and textured and wonky pieces exude a fearlessness that’s just great for a Monday. Welcome aboard, Jude!

Black cameos honor the past

Dianne Quarles' cameos celebrate Black women on PolymerClayDaily.com

“I saw many elegant, beautiful cameos but only one with the face of a black woman so I started making my own,” says Atlanta-based Dianne Quarles.

The name, Maruva comes from the initials of four generations of creative Black women in Dianne’s family. Her Maruvian Women series honors her great grandmother, a runaway slave who became a successful, independent “modes”.

Each face is customized to give it an original personality. “Black Panther,” was the inspiration for her warrior women. The symbols are from the Ashante tribe of Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire.

The works are featured in the Roswell Roots Arts Festival, in Roswell, GA for the month of February.

Handy polymer and a global exhibit

Kathryn Corbin solves a problem and sets up an exhibit on PolymerClayDaily

This quirky, abstract pendant from Massachusetts’ Kathryn Corbin is both decorative and efficient when you have no pockets and a house littered with reading glasses always out of reach.

Kathryn solved her problem in an arty way. Bits of pattern, some rough texture, and colors that go with everything ending in a loop for hanging readers. Why be boring? We’re artists!

Kathryn loves to experiment in the studio and she sent this and pix of other juicy projects along to prove it.

We were chatting about the IPCA global interactive exhibit in February. The deadline for submission is January 15 which gives you plenty of time. Lots of categories and awards!  Not an IPCA member? Join here.