Polymer schnitzels

Kim Arden cooks up some polymer schnitzel on PolymerClayDaily.com

“I love making these veneer sheets out of the tiny schnitzels that I get after cutting out pendants and earrings,” says Ohio’s Kim Arden.

Kim Arden cooks up some polymer schnitzel on PolymerClayDaily.com

“I gather up all the bits and piece them together like a puzzle. Once assembled, I’ll put a backing behind it for strength. It’s painstaking but an enjoyable task that I came up with just by fooling around with scraps.” she says. This petal necklace is one of the results.

Since I’m working to finish a new book on scraps this felt like a big gift dropped into my lap.

Kim proves my theory that all the bits of design decisions in “schnitzel” can add up to something richer, bigger, bolder than we ever expected.

Read more and see Kim’s in-process shots here on Facebook. Thanks to Kim (and to Sue Screws for pointing it out).

The vibrancy of fall

My vacation’s over! This necklace with wild fall colors from Ukraine’s Irina Karminova shows us how vibrant and exciting the season ahead can be if you keep your eyes open.

Welcome back! Vibrant fall colors from Irina Karminova on PolymerClayDaily.com

Irina explains that “I rarely use such shades in my work, but a recent walk in the park inspired me! I saw a bush of fall wild barberry with leaves of pink-purple colors and bright red berries! So unusual and beautiful! And I decided to make it!”

Thanks for coming back for a daily dose of polymer art that will nudge your work forward.

If you hunger for more, trot right on over to StudioMojo.org for a weekend wrap up and insider’s look.

Scrap necklace

Janet Bouey strings many design decisions into a visually rich necklace on PolymerClayDaily.com

Vancouver Island’s Janet Bouey shows us how great a collection of scraps can look when gathered into a necklace. She’s in a show on Vancouver Island this weekend.

This photo came as my mountain of scrap from vacation working/playing confronts me. Thanks to Janet, I’ll be covering some extruded tubes for future use. Bake, slice, assemble and somehow those many design decisions, mistakes and all, add up to a visually rich necklace.

I’m checking to see if I remember how to post after a month off. Whew, it all comes back. See you soon. 

 

RBG meets RGB

RGB meets RBG Dustin on PolymerClayDaily.com

This picture was just what I needed. Polymer clay shows up on the US Supreme Court in the form of Kathleen Dustin and Ruth Bader Ginsberg at the Smithsonian Art2Wear show.

Go see this tiny but monumental force (RBG) purchasing polymer art from an artistic force (RGB Dustin).

Something in this world is headed in the right direction.

I’m still on hiatus but checking in from time to time. Happy Monday to you.

The fashion of Fall

Christine Pecaut's necklace mimics falling leaves on PolymerClayDaily

This necklace from France’s Christine Pecaut (Chifonie) reminds us that falling leaves will quickly be back in fashion.

Christine’s leaves are a combination of shapes, textures, and stripes bisected by thin spines of twisted clay rolls or sharply cut slivers.

The angles mimic the way leaves fall from the trees and a few random dark beads break up the symmetry. Is it fall in your studio?

Second looks, second versions

Why a dot necklace deserved a second look on PolymerClayDaily
Why a dot necklace deserved a second look on PolymerClayDaily

The first version of this necklace was suspended from a hook in my studio for years. I liked it but I just wasn’t sure. “Too simple? Too spare?” I asked myself (it’s here on my Instagram)

This year I thought, “I really like that necklace.” I pulled if off the hook and every time I wore it someone commented. What held me back?

I’m betting that you have pieces in your studio that call to you and deserve a second look. What holds you back?

The tubes are extruded polymer and the dots are added in a “tab and slot” step. This is my 2019 Colorado version modeled here by Katie Way’s daughter, Taylor. My mind is buzzing with upgrades.

Chasing the rainbow

Caroline Casswell chases the rainbow with her big links on PolymerClayDaily

Patterned links chase each other around in this necklace by the UK’s Caroline Casswell. Rainbow colors blend into each other.

This necklace is part of Caroline’s display at Wave 7 Gallery in Wadebridge Cornwall.

The links are sturdy and there’s something fun about this play of color and pattern. But of course, it takes planning and skill to make the blends flow so smoothly. See more in this series on her website.

Summertime catch-up

Diana Crialesi spruces up her shop for summer on PolymerClayDaily.com

Rome’s Diana Crialesi (Archidee) has uploaded photos of her latest summer polymer jewelry.

She was so engrossed with making work, shooting tutorials and teaching that she fell behind in stocking her online store. Now she’s caught up and has added photos of the backlog to her shop and Instagram.

One look at her YouTube channel and you’ll understand what distracted her.

In the video, Diana assembles this bright piece (skip ahead to 11:00) with its t-bar closure and square opening on a turquoise silk cord. Simple and summery.

Finding new friends

Two sisters tickle our fancy with their quirky colors and designs on PolymerClayDaily.com

I went out looking for new friends. Not that you’re all not just lovely but who couldn’t use a few more friends?

What I found was a mystery. Two sisters, one from Texas and one from Nebraska, teamed up 12 years ago to exercise some creative muscle under the Crone Art label. They make and market buttons and pendants and earrings and whatever suits their fancy in polymer.

The sisters keep their identities on the down-low but someone out there probably knows this duo.

What words would you use to describe their Instagram? Oddball? Seriously mischevious? Minimalists? Modern?

In this pendant, they stack their round buttons in oval cups to form a pendant on a thick cord. Wearable and whimsical.

 

Simple or complex

Paula Kennedy decides how simple or serious she wants to be on PolymerClayDaily.com

It’s Memorial Day in the US. These red, white, and blue polymer flipflop earrings from Texas’ Paula Kennedy are the perfect accessory for the local parade.

Paula Kennedy decides how simple or serious she wants to be on PolymerClayDaily.com

Paula usually creates much more intense and complex projects (like this silver and polymer micromosaic feather necklace) but on a day like today, it’s hard to resist cute.

You decide how serious or silly, how simple or complex you want your work to be.

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