Wormy polymer

Dunn on PCDaily

Judy Dunn’s clever constructions and her polymer folded cranes peace project kept catching my eye as I thumbed through the archives. Her tutorials for making cranes are still on YouTube.

Judy’s life got busy and she was pulled to other pursuits. I sent her a note saying that we miss her fine work and I hope she comes back to polymer. In the meanwhile, we can still learn from the ways she combined and recombined short wormlike shapes into interesting groups for earrings and necklaces.

Vacation posts from the archives

Damascus with a twist

Wujick on PCDaily

Virginia’s Tina Wujick has an affinity for the Damascus cane and when she took a Skyscraper class with Iris Mishly earlier this year, she saw new possibilities. On Tina’s newest earrings black bisects the cane for added interest.

Wujick on PCDaily

This week you’ll see snapshots of works in progress as a group of us play here in Virginia. “What if…” is our mantra as we take what we know and turn it on its head.

Tina is also making bright beads with rope edges from her bright pieces of cane as she tries to give her favorite technique her personal signature.

Hot polymer colors

Anar on PCDaily

Angeliki Anar has been throwing around polymer colors with exhuberance recently. Here are just a couple of examples of what this Greek artist has been churning out.

On these earrings Angeliki slices flat pieces of color that have been dusted with rainbow flecks (how does she do that) and shapes them into shallow cones. Contrasting edges heighten the color mix further. When she adds a glaze, you’d swear they were ceramic or perhaps enamel.

Anar on PCDaily

On the bangles she textures center beads that are captured between black polymer spirals. Take some time to soak up the warmth radiating from her work on Flickr and on her Facebook page. Have a warm, sunny weekend.

Polymer and math and meditation

A little quiet time in the studio got me thinking about how meditative working with polymer can be. These earrings from None of the Above are a perfect example.

In Daniel Torres’ class at Synergy he explained how repeating patterns like these appeal to us because they are found in nature – Fibonnaci numbers, fractals and such. Anybody have their class notes handy?

None of the Above knows nature’s math and she calculates with perfectly arranged dots of clay. Fascinating and mesmerizing work on Etsy.

Speaking of numbers, tomorrow’s post marks a special one for me. 2000! Maybe that’s why I’ve been contemplative! Whew!

 

 

Integrating findings

Washington’s Dede Leupold hammers leftover bits of silver into soft shapes that harmonize with her canes for an elegant effect and easy assembly. Baked into the clay the silver also provides a sturdy finding.

Leupold on PCDaily

Dede gravitates to canework and she has come up with a folding mirror to carry in your toolbox so that you can accurately predict how a pattern repeats. It’s a handy device to have when you’re building a cane that’s full of confusing color and geometry. Enjoy Dede’s spring colors on Facebook and in an Etsy shop for jewelry and one for buttons.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...


  • I'm Cynthia Tinapple, an artist, curator, and leader in the polymer clay community for over 20 years.

    On this blog I showcase the best polymer clay art online to inspire and encourage you. I also send out weekend extras in the premium newsletter, StudioMojo.

    You can find my book, Polymer Clay Global Perspectives, on Amazon.


  • Here are 4 ways to get daily posts


  • Download your FREE eBook
    7 Great Ways to Teach Yourself Polymer Clay.
    Contains 62 free resources for learning polymer clay online.

    Click here to download.