Wintery polymer

Meike Lucia Friemel brings winter to polymer on PolymerClayDaily.com

“It has to be a long time ago when we had such a winter with low temperature and so much snow. Of course, I went out for frosty photos and frosty hands and feet,” says Germany’s Meike Lucia Friemel (MeikeLucia) who is both a metalworker and polymer artist.

“I like the difference between “slow” metalwork and “fast” clay work,” she says. Polymer gives her the possibility of neverending color.

See how Meike brought the wintery weather into these bangles. They may make you shiver here on Facebook and Flickr.

Explosions of color

Lindsay Locatelli combines color and dimension on a volcanic cuff on PolymerClayDaily

Small volcanos threaten to spew color all over the place on Lindsay Locatelli’s latest cuff.

Painted spouts rise up and give the piece a weirdly satisfying dimension. Then just when you’re creeped out by the spitting spouts, you notice the sumptuous gold leaf on the interior. This cuff delights on all cylinders.

Lindsay’s toddler doesn’t seem to have slowed down her creative output. She’s teaching a 4-day class in Wisconsin next weekend. Don’t miss her spiky earrings on Instagram.

Polymer on demand

See how Christine Damm makes a successful design last and last on PolymerClayDaily.com

Vermont’s Christine Damm worked and re-worked strips of bright summery veneer with layers of paint and crackle and whatever media suited her fancy.

She liked the resulting sheet of designs so much that before she adhered the polymer to this brass cuff, she scanned the image into her computer so that she could print the successful design onto scarves, pillows or any number of other items.

Go to ShopVida.com to see how one veneer translates into many items on demand.

No-fail knitting

Leila Bidler gives imitative knitting a new twist on PolymerClayDaily.com

Even if you never learned to knit, Italy’s Leila Bidler demonstrates how you can simulate the look. She extrudes strings of polymer in shades of blue, twists them and lines them up…without dropping a stitch!

A second layer of stitching every inch or so gives the swatch the look of a fancier pattern and more complex knitting.

On Leila’s Instagram page she turns these faux knits into cozy cuffs and finishes them with a faux wood button for a wintry accessory.

A snowy day is a perfect time to check out this season’s crop of faux knit ideas. Every year there’s some new twist. PCD’s all-time favorites are still Juliya Laukhina’s from 2010.

If you’re looking for more fun behind-the-scenes tidbits, come on over to StudioMojo where we indulge in deep polymer chats every Saturday morning. 

Properly cuffed

Baker's cuffs on PolymerClayDaily.com

Don’t you love the slightly concave curve of these cuffs from Boston’s Betsy Baker? Her silvery polymer veneers are enhanced by the brass forms.

This pile of prototypes is part of a new wholesale line Betsy is building. She offers this early peek on Instagram.

Go to her site to see how she elegantly transforms vintage components and gives them a fresh flair by combining them with polymer.

Tumbling blocks of polymer

nemravova_cuff_fb

Three shades of each color make up this faux dimensional cuff from Petra Nemravova of the Czech Republic. Such happy colors! Petra shows her step-by-step color-mixing and assembly process free on her website.

Of course you’ll want to spend some time in her tutorials and tools departments! There are a couple tutorials in her Etsy shop too.

Ancient updated


Stettler on PCdaily

Switzerland’s Anouk Stettler (habetrotdesign)  updates tribal designs and mixes them with modern materials and sensibilities.

Stettler on PCDaily

This brass and polymer cuff, she says, is one she wears often. Her designs have a freshness about them and she pairs textures and shapes that you may not expect.

You can do a little detective work on Instagram, Flickr and Facebook.

Nailed it

Primatoide on PCDaily

The bangle at the right could have been clipped out of a Paul Klee painting. France’s Agnes (Primatoide) calls it her Ancient Assyrian Ceramic Cuff which is made of polymer, inks and paint.

But I bet Paul Klee didn’t make nail art to match his paintings!

Primatoide on PCDaily

Agnes takes her nail art seriously and moves it to a whole new level. She was inspired by Claire Wallis’ caned nails. Now Agnes often creates companion polymer nail art for her jewelry.

Even if nail art doesn’t suit your fashion sense, you may find her methods and concepts fascinating. See more of her rough, ancient polymer on Flickr.

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